IS THERE A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA AND DIABETES?

Publications

Share / Export Citation / Email / Print / Text size:

Postępy Mikrobiologii - Advancements of Microbiology

Polish Society of Microbiologists

Subject: Microbiology

GET ALERTS

ISSN: 0079-4252
eISSN: 2545-3149

DESCRIPTION

20
Reader(s)
28
Visit(s)
0
Comment(s)
0
Share(s)

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue / page

Related articles

VOLUME 60 , ISSUE 3 (Sep 2021) > List of articles

IS THERE A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA AND DIABETES?

Alicja Wujkowska / Beata Sińska *

Keywords : diabetes, dysbiosis, insulin resistance, microbiom, gut microbiota

Citation Information : Postępy Mikrobiologii - Advancements of Microbiology. Volume 60, Issue 3, Pages 195-200, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/PM-2021.60.3.15

License : (CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0)

Received Date : April-2021 / Accepted: June-2021 / Published Online: 23-September-2021

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Due to the total number of microorganisms and multitude of roles they play in the human body, intestinal bacteria are increasingly called the “microbial organ”. Proper composition of the gastrointestinal microbiome is necessary to maintain human health. According to the latest studies, the imbalance in the composition of intestinal microorganisms, called dysbiosis, can result in development of numerous diseases, including metabolic disorders e.g. diabetes. The incidence of this disease is constantly increasing. The pathogenesis of diabetes is complicated and not yet fully understood. However, it is known that many factors influence its development. Intestinal microbiota is increasingly mentioned among them. Based on a literature review related to the subject, it can be concluded that dysbiosis, intestinal barrier damage and endotoxemia adversely affect metabolic parameters.

Zważywszy na liczebność drobnoustrojów oraz mnogość ról jakie spełniają w organizmie ludzkim, bakterie jelitowe są nazywane coraz częściej „narządem bakteryjnym”. Prawidłowy skład mikrobiomu przewodu pokarmowego jest niezbędny do zachowania zdrowia człowieka. Według najnowszych prac badawczych, zachwiana równowaga składu mikroorganizmów jelitowych, zwana dysbiozą, może powodować rozwój licznych jednostek chorobowych m.in. zaburzeń metabolicznych, do których należy cukrzyca. Zachorowalność na tę chorobę nieustannie wzrasta. Patogeneza cukrzycy jest skomplikowana i dotychczas nie do końca poznana. Jednak wiadomo, że na jej rozwój wpływa wiele czynników. Wśród nich, coraz częściej wymienia się mikrobiotę jelitową. Na podstawie przeglądu literatury stwierdza się, że dysbioza jelitowa, nieszczelność jelit i endotoksemia mogą niekorzystnie wpływać na parametry metaboliczne.

1. Introduction

The intestinal microbiota is a group of microorganisms found in the human digestive tract. The number of microorganisms reaches approx. 1014 cells per 1 gram of intestinal content. It is assumed that about 1500 species of intestinal bacteria may be found in the digestive tract [13, 22, 25]. It makes the intestinal microbiota one of the most complex and diversified ecosystems on Earth [22, 25]. It was demonstrated that intestinal dysbiosis, i.e. a sudden imbalance in the composition of microbiota might promote the development of numerous conditions, including metabolic disorders such as diabetes [20, 22, 32]. The pathomechanism of diabetes is complex and has not been fully elucidated yet. Nevertheless, it is known that it may be influenced by numerous factors, both genetic and environmental ones [14]. Intestinal microbiota is more and more commonly listed as a factor determining the etiopathogenesis of diabetes [7, 22, 32]. More and more studies provide evidence for the role of microorganisms in the human digestive tract in the development of metabolic diseases. It is necessary to summarize evidence from current studies reporting microbial associations with diabetes. Understanding of the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders would improve their prevention and treatment. Additionally, developing specific recommendations and strategies for changing the composition of the microbiome can be very helpful in successful prevention of diabetes [8, 21].

2. The composition and distribution of microorganisms in the digestive tract

Various conditions are observed in individual segments of the digestive tract, which contributes to the diversification of the composition of the microbiota [25]. About 108 cfu/g of bacterial content is located in the oral cavity. The main types of bacteria are: Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Peptococcus, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Fusobacterium [19, 22, 25]. As regards the stomach the microbial density is 101–103 cfu/g. The acidity of stomach content makes the stomach, esophagus and duodenum the least colonized areas of the digestive tract. Apart from Helicobacter pylori in the stomach there are following divisions of bacteria: Firmicutes (genera: Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Streptococcus, Veillonella), Proteobacteria (Escherichia), Actinobacteria (Bifidobacterium) and a low quantity of fungi of the genus Candida [19]. Molecular biology techniques were used to confirm the presence of the following bacterial genera in the stomach: Prevotella, Caulobacter, Actinobacillus, Corynebacterium, Rothia, Gemella, Leptotrichia, Porphyromonas, Capnocytophaga and Deinococcus [5]. The ileum may only be colonized by microorganisms capable of adhering to its walls. This segment of the digestive tract was found to be colonized by about 107–108 cfu/g and a considerable content of Bacteroides, Clostridium, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and bacteria of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The most beneficial conditions in terms of intestinal bacteria development occur in the large intestine. A total of 1012–1014 bacteria per 1 ml of the content, i.e. approx. 1.2 kg, were noted in the colon. The following genera of bacteria are dominant in this segment of the digestive tract: Fusobacterium, Ruminococcus, Eubacterium, Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium with smaller quantities of Bacillus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Streptococcus spp., Clostridium spp ., Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis [19, 22, 25]. It was demonstrated that the intestinal microbiota also included the genera: Peptostreptococcus, Klebsiella, Proteus and the species Finegoldia magna and Micromonas micros [16]. However, the dominant divisions are Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes [19]. Eckburg et al. [11] demonstrated the presence of Proteobacteria, Fusobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Actinobacteria in the large intestine. Qin et al. [33] reported that the intestinal microbiome in adults contained species which produced butyrate, including Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Roseburia intestinalis and Bacteroides uniformis. The intestinal ecosystem also includes archaea, viruses and fungi [19, 22, 25].

3. The functions of intestinal microorganisms

Incessant communication occurs between bacteria and between the cells of the host and bacteria. It contributes to the maintenance of balance in the human body and is a condition of health or disease. The microbiome has numerous functions which are classified into 4 groups: immunological, metabolic, trophic and protective [22].

Microorganisms constitute a significant element in shaping the correct immune response, since the first contact with them occurs as early as in utero. It is an important process in the maturation of the immune system which also translates into immunity in adulthood [22]. The metabolic function comprises the production of vitamin K, group B vitamins and the increased absorption of minerals and electrolytes, i.e. sodium, calcium, magnesium and potassium. The intestinal microbiota also plays a role in the fermentation of food residues in the small intestine and in the production of enzymes facilitating the initial stages of digestion. Indigestible carbohydrates are turned into short-chain fatty acids which occurs via anaerobic fermentation. They are the source of energy for intestinal epithelium. About 70% of energy is delivered to colonocytes from butyric acid which also stimulates the development of intestinal epithelial tissue and inhibits the development of inflammation [15, 16, 22, 25]. The remaining products of anaerobic fermentation enable the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism which is also supported by microorganisms acting as bile salt hydrolase (BSH), e.g. Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus [45]. The trophic function mainly involves the protection of the intestinal epithelial tissue and the regulation of peristaltic movement. The synthesis of nutrients for intestinal epithelium by intestinal bacteria markedly reduces the risk of its discontinuation. Moreover, the microbiome stimulates colonocytes to produce the mucous layer formed by mucins. The layer is a barrier which protects the epithelium against toxins and pathogenic microorganisms. The protective function encompasses all activities which protect the host’s body against pathogen colonization [16, 27]. There are numerous ways of the elimination of pathogenic bacteria by beneficial microorganisms. Some of them are removed through the mechanism of competitive inhibition, while protection against unfavorable organisms may also occur as a result of triggering immune system mechanisms. Immune response is activated by binding TLR (toll-like receptors) and NOD (nucleotide oligomerization domain) to bacterial cells. Inflammatory mediators are released and an inflammatory response develops. Intestinal bacteria stimulate the production of IgA and IgG antibodies, activate lymphocytes and phagocytosis which enables rapid and effective pathogen elimination. Moreover, a change in the profile of produced cytokines and the suppression of an already existing inflammation were observed. Therefore, the activity of the human intestinal microbiome is multidirectional, and due to the number of bacterial cells in the digestive tract it is more and more commonly called the “bacterial organ” [13, 20, 22, 25, 27].

4. Factors influencing the composition of the intestinal microorganisms

Numerous factors shape the intestinal microbiota both in neonates and in adults. Prenatal and postnatal factors are distinguished in newborns. The most important postnatal factors include: type of delivery (vaginal delivery or cesarean section), feeding method (breast milk or formula) and gestational age. Other important factors are genetic ones, environmental conditions of the child’s development and the use of drugs and antibiotics in children. The composition of intestinal microorganisms in adults is influenced by a number of determinants such as age, sex, diet, taking antibiotics or other drugs, the use of probiotics and/or prebiotics, and geographic factors. A significant role is also played by pH in digestive tract segments, intestinal passage and peristaltic capacity. The quantitative and qualitative composition of intestinal microorganisms is variable depending on the point of time in human life. The intestinal microbiome is shaped individually. It means that every person has a personal exceptional set of intestinal microorganisms [1, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 27].

5. Intestinal dysbiosis – an imbalance in microbiome composition

Dysbiosis is an imbalance in the complex network of interactions between microorganisms and the host which translates into rapid quantitative and/or qualitative disturbances of the composition of the microbiome. Microbiome disorders may be due to numerous factors. The main ones include: high-protein and low-fiber diet, highly-processed “western diet” which is rich in fats, carbohydrates and preservatives, the overuse of antibiotics and chronic stress. Dysbiosis weakens the intestinal barrier which may contribute to the penetration of pathogens into the body and initiate an inflammation. Moreover, the disturbed balance in the microbiota results in the deteriorated synthesis of zonulin 1 and occludin proteins which, together with tight junctions and desmosomes provide enterocyte integrity. The lack of the above proteins means that the intestinal barrier is discontinued and, as a consequence, it is penetrated by antigens and toxic substances. Lipopolysaccharide, which has proinflammatory properties, is the most dangerous endotoxin in the body. It is an integral component of Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane. LPS and SCFA (short-chain fatty acids) contribute to the development of harmful metabolic processes, e.g.:

  • they activate the protein-binding receptor G41, which initiates the formation of peptide YY and decelerates intestinal passage leading to energy concentration,

  • they impair the activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) which reduces the oxidation of fatty acids in the muscles and liver, so they are deposited in the adipose tissue,

  • lipopolysaccharide initiates the development of a chronic inflammation which has a negative im pact on metabolism: it intensifies liver steatosis, increases insulin resistance, impairs the capacity of muscles to utilize glucose and causes the macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue [4, 13, 21, 34, 36, 43].

6. Diabetes as a civilization disease

Diabetes is a non-communicable chronic metabolic disease which is characterized by hyperglycemia, i.e. increased blood glucose levels resulting from a defect in insulin secretion and/or activity. It was also defined as a group of metabolic disorders accompanied by carbohydrate balance abnormalities which may result in the impairment of the function of numerous organs and system, i.e. the kidneys, blood vessels, eyes, heart and the nervous system. The manifestations indicating this condition include: increased diuresis, polydipsia, unintended weight loss, general malaise, somnolence, inflammations of the urinary and genital systems, suppurative dermal lesions. Basing on the etiology, the WHO (World Health Organization) distinguished type 1 diabetes mellitus – autoimmune (LADA – latent autoimmune diabetes of adults) and idiopathic, type 2 diabetes mellitus, gestational diabetes mellitus and other specific types of diabetes [3, 42]. According to the United Nations Organization the disease is the epidemic of the 21st century. In 2015 a total of 415 million people suffered from diabetes with the prevalence still increasing. It was estimated that, globally, 642 million people would have diabetes in 2040 [14]. According to National Health Fund in Poland in 2018 there were 2,86 million of adult patients with diabetes. However, a 2019 report found that additional 1,7 million may not be aware of their disease. It is estimated, that the number of diabetic patients in Poland has reached 3 million [24].

According to the guidelines published by the Polish Diabetes Association in 2020 [3] the treatment of type 1 diabetes is based on insulin therapy. It is recommended to use insulin analogues due to the reduced risk of hypoglycemia and a higher comfort of patients’ lives. Furthermore, screening tests are conducted to enable the early detection of chronic diabetes complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy. The reduction of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes is based on the regulation of its pathomechanisms, i.e. insulin resistance and impaired insulin release. The treatment needs to be progressive and adjusted to the individual stages of diabetes development. If the effectiveness of the treatment decreases (the target level of glycated hemoglobin is not reached) the next stage is started within 3–6 months. Four stages of the treatment of type 2 diabetes are distinguished. Monotherapy is the first one. It involves changes in the lifestyle and the introduction of metformin at low doses to avoid adverse effects. In case of metformin intolerance, the following may be introduced: the derivatives of sulfonylurea, DPP-4 inhibitors, the inhibitors of sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2), or a PPAR-gamma antagonist. The second stage involves the treatment with oral agents or GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) receptor antagonists. The third stage encompasses changes in the lifestyle, once-daily insulin regimen and the possibility of continuing the administration of metformin, other oral agents or a GLP-1 receptor antagonist. The fourth stage is characterized by the management described in stage 3 with the change from once-daily insulin regimen into multiple daily injection therapy. In case of the excessive disruption of pancreatic β cell structure it may be necessary to increase the intensity of treatment and introduce insulin [3].

Nutritional management is also an element of diabetes treatment. Diabetic patients should adhere to the rules of healthy eating and consume regular meals, limit the consumption of simple and easily-absorbable carbohydrates to a minimum and select products with low glycemic index (GI). The correct supply of dietary fiber (20–40 g daily) is of high importance. The diet of a diabetic patient should also include limited amounts of saturated fatty acids, and table salt. Alcohol consumption is not recommended [42]. Notably, dietary recommendations in diabetes promote the maintenance of normal intestinal microbiota and decrease the risk of developing intestinal dysbiosis [15, 27].

7. Intestinal microbiota and types 1 and 2 diabetes

The intestinal microbiota plays a key role in metabolic diseases. Changes in the proportions of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria were reported in diabetics and obese individuals. Contrary to healthy persons, patients with diabetes were characterized by lower quantities of bacteria producing butyrate, such as R. intestinalis and F. prausnitzii, and the increased quantities of Proteobacteria, Lactobacillus gasseri, Streptococcus mutans and some strains of Clostridium [28, 38].

A study including 30 obese individuals revealed a lower number of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, i.e. protective and anti-inflammatory microorganisms from the Firmicutes genus, in 7 subjects with type 2 diabetes. The quantity of the bacteria increased after a bariatric surgery had been performed in those patients. However, the quantity of F. prausnitzii was still lower compared to healthy individuals. Furthermore, reduced concentrations of glucose, insulin, HbA1c in the blood and increased insulin resistance were also observed. The result was estimated basing on the HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) test. The markers of inflammation IL-6 and CRP (C-reactive protein) also decreased [12]. Larsen et al. [17] analyzed the composition of the microbiome of 36 individuals. A total of 18 persons in the study group had type 2 diabetes. Their body weight varied. The quantity of Firmicutes and Clostridia was reduced in the digestive tracts of type 2 diabetics. It was also demonstrated that the proportion between Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes was correlated with blood glucose concentrations regardless of BMI values.

The dominance of Proteobacteria genus was noted in persons at the early stage of insulin resistance which was assumed to be a diagnostic marker of developing diabetes [2]. The decreased quantities of Akkermansia muciniphila, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Verrucomicrobiae were also correlated with deteriorated insulin resistance [44]. A study by Vrieze et al. [40] demonstrated that transferring a stool sample from slim individuals into the digestive tracts of type 2 diabetics resulted in increasing the number of bacteria producing butyric acid which improved insulin sensitivity.

An inflammation triggered by endotoxemia, particularly by the proinflammatory element of the external cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria, i.e. lipopolysaccharide, promotes the development of type 2 diabetes. Endotoxemia increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes as a result of aggravated insulin resistance and elevated fasting glycemia [9]. Creely et al. [10] measured the concentrations of LPS in the plasma of healthy persons and type 2 diabetics. The results were higher in persons with type 2 diabetes compared to healthy ones. Moreover, it is thought that the intravenous administration of LPS to mice contributes to the development of obesity and insulin resistance. A high-energy high-fat diet increases lipopolysaccharide concentrations in the human body as a result of the increased colonization of the intestines with microorganisms including this endotoxin [6]. No changes associated with high-fat diet consumption were observed in mice with the modified CD14/TLR-4 genes. They were also resistant to lipopolysaccharide activity which was associated with the lower expression of immune pathways in the liver [9, 26, 35].

Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein produced in the liver and circulating in the bloodstream. LBP recognizes LPS and strengthens the host’s immune response. The level of LBP is increased in individuals with abnormal glucose tolerance and may be a marker of inflammation associated with insulin resistance concomitant with obesity [31]. Sun et al. [37] demonstrated that an increased blood concentration of LBP was correlated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and neoplasms.

It was shown that the increased quantity of Bifidobacterium spp. resulted in decreasing the inflammation in obese mice via increasing the production of GLP-1. The permeability of the intestine also diminished. Higher quantities of Bifidobacterium spp. was also related to the increased secretion of peptide YY by the intestines. Both GLP-1 and peptide YY improved pancreatic β cell function and reduced insulin resistance [18, 26, 39].

The intestinal microbiota influences the development of insulin resistance and diabetes also via the formation of secondary biliary acids and their metabolism which, as a result of the activation of such receptors as FXR (farnesoid X receptor) and TGR5 (G-protein-coupled membrane receptor), participate in the metabolism of glucose, lipids and the regulation of insulin sensitivity. It was demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes were characterized by lowered concentrations of secondary biliary acids [18, 23].

Differences in the composition of the microbiota of type 1 diabetics and healthy individuals are observable even before the onset of the clinical manifestations of the disease. It is suspected that the interactions between the intestinal microbiome and the immune system are associated with the increased tendency towards developing type 1 diabetes. Wen et al. [41] investigated the role of TLRs, MyD88 protein and intestinal bacteria. The analysis included mice whose pancreatic β cells were destroyed by activated immune system cells. The TLR receptors recognizing bacterial infections are responsible for the immune reaction against pathogens. MyD88 protein is used by the TLRs and participates in immune response. It was demonstrated that type 1 diabetes did not develop in the NOD (non-obese diabetic) rodent model, while the manifestations of the disease were observed in GF (germ-free) mice devoid of MyD88 protein. The colonization of the digestive tract of mice with several genera of bacteria making up the human microbiota caused the suppression of T1D (type 1 diabetes) manifestations. The changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiota were linked to the elimination of MyD88 protein. Fecal microbiota transplantation from mice free of type 1 diabetes (the NOD model without MyD88 protein) into the digestive tract of the same model of GF mice (with type 1 diabetes) resulted in the alleviation of clinical manifestations.

It is worth noting the role of T helper type 17 (Th17) lymphocytes and abnormal regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of T1D. It is assumed that changes in the intestinal microbiota might contribute to the imbalance between Th17 and Treg lymphocytes [8]. Moreover, a study conducted by Peng et al. [30] revealed that the quantitative and qualitative disorders of intestinal bacteria might reduce the resistance of intestinal mucous membrane and exacerbate the process of autoimmunization. CD8 regulatory T cells may influence the development of intestinal dysbiosis and, as a consequence, type 1 diabetes. A study by Pellegrini et al. [29] revealed that the profile of inflammatory mediators and microbiome disorders in the mucous membrane of the duodenum were disease-specific in the course of T1D compared to a group of patients with celiac disease and healthy individuals.

8. Conclusions

An increasing tendency in the number of new diabetes cases has been observed over the past years. Therefore, the role of the intestinal microbiota is emphasized in the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders. The microbiome influences their development in a variety of mechanisms, e.g. via the induction of inflammation by endotoxemia or the production of secondary fatty acids. Significant changes are observed in the composition of the intestinal microbiota in patients with insulin resistance and diabetes compared the microbiome of healthy individuals. The correlation between the intestinal microbiota and diabetes has not been sufficiently corroborated yet. Therefore, it is necessary to confirm the influence of human intestinal microorganisms on the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders in multicenter studies including a large study group. It is important to demonstrate whether the modifications of microbiota composition contribute to the occurrence of diabetes or if they are only the result of the disease or many years of inappropriate nutrition. Future research should be oriented towards the determination whether the modulation of the intestinal microbiota may constitute a target in nutrition therapy or pharmacological treatment in case of diabetes.

1. Wprowadzenie

Mikrobiota jelitowa to zespół mikroorganizmów bytujących w przewodzie pokarmowym człowieka. Liczebność drobnoustrojów sięga około 1014 komórek na 1 gram treści. Przypuszcza się, że w przewodzie pokarmowym bytuje około 1500 gatunków bakterii jelitowych [13, 22, 25]. To czyni mikrobiotę jelitową jednym z najbardziej złożonych i zróżnicowanych ekosystemów na Ziemi [22, 25]. Wykazano, że dysbioza jelitowa, czyli nagłe zachwianie równowagi składu mikrobioty może sprzyjać rozwojowi wielu jednostek chorobowych, w tym również zaburzeń metabolicznych, do których należy cukrzyca [20, 22, 32]. Patomechanizm cukrzycy jest skomplikowany i dotychczas nie w pełni poznany. Wiadomo natomiast, że na jej rozwój mogą wpływać liczne czynniki, zarówno genetyczne, jak i środowiskowe [14]. Wśród elementów determinujących etiopatogenezę cukrzycy coraz częściej wymienia się mikrobiotę jelitową [7, 22, 32]. Coraz więcej doniesień naukowych sugeruje występowanie związku między mikroorganizmami przewodu pokarmowego człowieka a rozwojem chorób metabolicznych. Istnieje zatem potrzeba przeglądu aktualnych prac badawczych dotyczących roli mikrobioty jelitowej w patogenezie cukrzycy. Dokładne poznanie patogenezy zaburzeń metabolicznych pozwoliłoby na poprawę ich prewencji i leczenia. Dodatkowo, opracowanie szczegółowych zaleceń oraz strategii zmiany składu mikrobiomu może być bardzo pomocne w skutecznym zapobieganiu występowania cukrzycy [8, 21].

2. Skład i rozmieszczenie mikroorganizmów w przewodzie pokarmowym

W każdym odcinku przewodu pokarmowego panują różne warunki, co sprawia, że skład mikrobioty jest zróżnicowany [25]. W jamie ustnej zlokalizowane jest około 108 jtk/g treści. Głównymi rodzajami bakterii są: Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Peptococcus, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Fusobacterium [19, 22, 25]. Natomiast gęstość mikrobiologiczna żołądka wynosi 101–103 jtk/g. W związku z kwaśnym środowiskiem panującym w żołądku jest on wraz z przełykiem i dwunastnicą najmniej skolonizowanym przez bakterie odcinkiem przewodu pokarmowego. Poza Helicobacter pylori występują w nim bakterie z gromady Firmicutes (rodzaje Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Streptococcus, Veilonella), Proteobacteria (Escherichia), Actinobacteria (Bifidobacterium) oraz niewielka liczba grzybów z rodzaju Candida [19]. W wyniku badań wykorzystujących techniki biologii molekularnej odkryto obecność w żołądku także bakterii z rodzaju Prevotella, Caulobacter, Actinobacillus, Corynebacterium, Rothia, Gemella, Leptotrichia, Porhyrmomnas, Capnocythophaga oraz Deinococcus [5]. Jelito kręte mogą skolonizować jedynie drobnoustroje mające zdolność do adherencji do jego ścian. Stwierdzono w tym odcinku przewodu pokarmowego około 107–108 jtk/g oraz znaczącą zawartość: Bacteroides, Clostridium, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella oraz bakterii z rodziny Enterobacteriaceae. Najdogodniejsze warunki rozwoju bakterii jelitowych znajdują się w jelicie grubym. W okrężnicy odnotowano 1012–1014 bakterii na 1 ml treści, czyli około 1,2 kg. Dominujący udział w tym odcinku przewodu pokarmowego mają bakterie z rodzajów: Fusobacterium, Ruminococcus, Eubacterium, Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium i w mniejszej ilości Bacillus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Streptococcus spp., Clostridium spp., Escherichia coli oraz Enterococcus feacalis [19, 22, 25]. Wykazano, że do mikrobioty jelitowej należą również rodzaje: Preptostreprococcus, Klebsiella, Proteus i gatunki Fenogoldia manga i Micromonas micros [16]. Jednak w szczególności dominują gromady Firmicutes i Bacteroidetes [19]. W badaniu Eckburg i wsp. [11] udowodniono obecność w jelicie grubym Proteobacteria, Fusobacteria, Verrucomicrobia i Actinobacteria. Natomiast Qin i wsp. [33] stwierdzili, że mikrobiom jelitowy u osób dorosłych tworzą gatunki bakterii produkujące maślan, do których zalicza się m.in. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Roseburia intestinalis i Bacteroides uniformie. Do ekosystemu jelitowego należą również archeony, wirusy oraz grzyby [19, 22, 25].

3. Funkcje mikroorganizmów jelitowych

Zarówno pomiędzy bakteriami, jak i komórkami bakterii oraz gospodarza zachodzi nieustanna komunikacja, która przyczynia do utrzymania równowagi w organizmie człowieka i warunkuje zdrowie lub chorobę. Mikrobiom spełnia wiele funkcji, które dzieli się na 4 grupy: immunologiczną, metaboliczną, troficzną i ochronną [22].

Mikroorganizmy stanowią istotny element w kształtowaniu prawidłowej odpowiedzi immunologicznej, gdyż pierwszy kontakt z drobnoustrojami człowiek zyskuje już w okresie wewnątrzmacicznym. Jest to znamienny proces w dojrzewaniu układu odpornościowego i przekłada się również na odporność w dorosłym życiu [22]. Funkcja metaboliczna obejmuje produkcję witaminy K, witamin z grupy B, ale również wzrost przyswajania składników mineralnych i elektrolitów tj. sodu, wapnia, magnezu i potasu. Mikrobiota jelitowa odpowiada także za fermentację resztek pokarmowych w jelicie cienkim oraz wytwarzaniem enzymów ułatwiających początkowe etapy trawienia. Z węglowodanów, których organizm ludzki nie jest w stanie rozłożyć, produkowane są krótkołańcuchowe kwasy tłuszczowe. Proces ten odbywa się na drodze fermentacji beztlenowej. Są one źródłem energii dla komórek nabłonka jelit. Około 70% energii dostarczane jest kolonocytom z kwasu masłowego, który jednocześnie stymuluje rozwój tkanki nabłonkowej jelit oraz hamuje rozwój stanów zapalnych [15, 16, 22, 25]. Pozostałe produkty fermentacji beztlenowej umożliwiają regulację metabolizmu glukozy i lipidów, w którym udział biorą również mikroorganizmy o aktywności hydrolazy soli żółci (bile salts hydrolase, BSH), m.in. pałeczki Bifidobacterium oraz Lactobacillus [45]. Funkcja troficzna polega głównie na ochronie tkanki nabłonkowej jelita oraz regulacji ruchów perystaltycznych. Synteza substancji odżywczych dla komórek nabłonka jelitowego przez bakterie jelitowe znacznie ogranicza ryzyko przerwania jego ciągłości. Dodatkowo, mikrobiom pobudza kolonocyty do produkcji warstwy śluzowej utworzonej przez mucyny. Warstwa ta jest barierą chroniącą nabłonek przed toksynami oraz mikrobiotą patogenną. Z kolei funkcja ochronna obejmuje wszelkie działania broniące organizm gospodarza przed kolonizacją patogenów [16, 27]. Istnieje wiele sposobów eliminacji patogennych mikroorganizmów przez korzystne drobnoustroje. Niektóre mikroorganizmy chorobotwórcze są usuwane na drodze inhibicji kompetytywnej, natomiast ochrona przed nimi może następować także w wyniku uruchomienia mechanizmów układu odpornościowego. Reakcję immunologiczną aktywuje połączenie receptorów TLR (toll-like receptors) i domen NOD (nucleotide oligomerisation domain) z komórkami bakteryjnymi. Następuje uwolnienie mediatorów stanu zapalnego oraz rozwój reakcji zapalnej. Bakterie jelitowe działają stymulująco na produkcję przeciwciał IgA i IgG, aktywują limfocyty oraz fagocytozę, co zapewnia szybką i skuteczną eliminację patogenów. Zaobserwowano także zmianę w profilu produkowanych cytokin i jednocześnie złagodzenie powstałego stanu zapalnego. Mikrobiom jelitowy człowieka działa zatem wielokierunkowo, a zważając dodatkowo na liczebność komórek bakteryjnych w przewodzie pokarmowym jest coraz częściej nazywany „narządem bakteryjnym” [13, 20, 22, 25, 27].

4. Czynniki wpływające na skład mikroorganizmów jelitowych

Istnieje wiele czynników kształtujących mikrobiotę jelitową zarówno u noworodków, jak i dorosłych. U noworodków uwarunkowania dzieli się na: prenatalne i postnatalne. Najważniejszymi czynnikami postnatalnymi są: rodzaj porodu (poród naturalny lub poprzez cesarskie cięcie), sposób karmienia niemowlęcia (pokarm matki lub sztuczny) oraz wiek ciążowy. Nie bez znaczenia są także czynniki genetyczne, warunki środowiskowe rozwoju dziecka oraz stosowanie antybiotyków i leków u dzieci. Na skład ilościowo-jakościowy mikroorganizmów jelitowych osób dorosłych ma wpływ szereg determinantów, takich jak wiek, płeć, dieta, podaż antybiotyków lub leków, stosowanie probiotyków i/lub prebiotyków czy też czynniki geograficzne. Istotną rolę odgrywa także pH panujące w odcinkach przewodu pokarmowego, pasaż jelitowy oraz sprawność perystaltyki. Skład ilościowy i jakościowy mikroorganizmów jelitowych jest zmienny w czasie życia człowieka, a mikrobiom jelit kształtuje się indywidualnie. To oznacza, że każda osoba ma swój osobisty, wyjątkowy zespół drobnoustrojów jelitowych [1, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 27].

5. Dysbioza jelitowa – zaburzenie równowagi w składzie mikrobiomu

Dysbioza jest zachwianiem skomplikowanej sieci interakcji między drobnoustrojami a organizmem gospodarza, co oznacza gwałtowne zaburzenia ilościowe i/lub jakościowe składu mikrobioty. Zaburzenia w mikrobiomie może powodować wiele czynników. Główne z nich to: dieta wysokobiałkowa, ubogobłonnikowa i wysoko przetworzona „dieta zachodnia” obfita w tłuszcz, cukier oraz konserwanty, a także stosowana w nadmiarze antybiotykoterapia i przewlekły stres. Dysbioza osłabia barierę jelitową, co może przyczyniać się do przenikania patogenów wewnątrz organizmu oraz inicjować rozwój stanu zapalnego. Dodatkowo, w wyniku zaburzonej równowagi mikrobioty następuje pogorszenie syntezy białek zonuliny 1 i okludyny, które razem z połączeniami szczelinowymi i desmosomami zapewniają integralność enterocytów. Brak wymienionych białek oznacza przerwanie ciągłości bariery jelitowej, w konsekwencji czego przenikają przez nią antygeny i toksyczne substancje. Najbardziej niebezpieczną endotoksyną jest lipopolisacharyd, działający prozapalnie. Jest on integralnym składnikiem zewnętrznej błony komórkowej bakterii Gram-ujemnych. LPS razem z SCFA (krótkołańcuchowe kwasy tłuszczowe) przyczyniają się do rozwoju szkodliwych procesów metabolicznych, np.:

  • aktywują receptor wiążący białko G41, co zapo-czątkowuje tworzenie peptydu YY i spowalnia pasaż jelitowy, powodując gromadzenie energii;

  • upośledzają aktywność kinazy proteinowej aktywowanej przez AMP (AMPK), co zmniejsza utlenianie kwasów tłuszczowych w mięśniach i wątrobie, które odkładają się w tkance tłuszczowej;

  • lipopolisacharyd inicjuje rozwój przewlekłego stanu zapalnego negatywnie oddziałującego na metabolizm: nasila stłuszczenie wątroby, zwiększa insulinooporność, upośledza zdolność mięśni do utylizacji glukozy oraz powoduje naciek makrofagów na tkankę tłuszczową [4, 13, 21, 34, 36, 43].

6. Cukrzyca jako choroba cywilizacyjna

Cukrzyca jest niezakaźną, przewlekłą chorobą metaboliczną, która cechuje się hiperglikemią, czyli zwiększonym stężeniem glukozy we krwi na skutek defektu w wydzielaniu i/lub działaniu insuliny. Została zdefiniowana także, jako zespół zaburzeń metabolicznych z towarzyszącymi nieprawidłowościami gospodarki węglowodanowej, który może skutkować upośledzeniem funkcji wielu narządów lub układów, tj. nerek, naczyń krwionośnych, narządu wzroku, serca czy też układu nerwowego. Objawy wskazujące na występowanie tej jednostki chorobowej to m.in wzmożona diureza i pragnienie, niezamierzona utrata masy ciała, ogólne osłabienie, senność, stany zapalne układu moczowego lub płciowego i ropne zmiany skórne. Ze względu na etiologię według WHO (World Health Organization, Światowa Organizacja Zdrowia) można wyróżnić cukrzycę typu 1 – autoimmunologiczą (LADA) i idiopatyczną, cukrzycę typu 2, cukrzycę ciążową oraz inne specyficzne typy cukrzycy [3, 42]. Według Organizacji Narodów Zjednoczonych choroba ta jest epidemią XXI wieku. W 2015 roku chorych na cukrzycę było 415 milionów, natomiast nadal obserwuje się wzrost zachorowalności. Oszacowano, że w 2040 roku osób z cukrzycą będzie na całym świecie 642 miliony [14]. W Polsce według Narodowego Funduszu Zdrowia w 2018 roku na cukrzycę chorowało 2,86 mln osób. Jednak z raportu z 2019 roku wynika, że dodatkowe 1,7 mln może nie być świadomych swojej choroby. Zatem szacuje się, że liczba chorych na cukrzycę sięgnęła ponad 3 milionów [24].

Według wytycznych Polskiego Towarzystwa Diabetologicznego z 2020 roku [3] leczenie cukrzycy typu 1 opiera się na insulinoterapii. Z uwagi na zmniejszenie ryzyka hipoglikemii oraz zapewnienie większego komfortu życia u pacjentów rekomenduje się stosowanie analogów insuliny. Prowadzi się również badania przesiewowe w celu wczesnego wykrywania przewlekłych powikłań cukrzycy, takich jak nefropatia, retinopatia czy neuropatia cukrzycowa. Redukcja hiperglikemii w cukrzycy typu 2 opiera się o regulację jej patomechanizmów, czyli insulinooporności oraz upośledzenia wyrzutu insuliny. Terapia musi być progresywna i należy dostosowywać ją do poszczególnych etapów rozwoju cukrzycy. W przypadku, gdy leczenie przestaje być skuteczne (docelowa wartość stężenia hemoglobiny glikowanej jest nieosiągnięta) w ciągu 3–6 miesięcy przechodzi się do następnego z etapów. Wyodrębnia się 4 etapy leczenia cukrzycy typu 2. Pierwszym etapem jest monoterapia. Polega ona na zmianach w stylu życia, rozpoczęciu przyjmowania metforminy w małych dawkach, aby uniknąć działań niepożądanych, a w przypadku nietolerancji metforminy wybraniu pochodnych sulfonylomocznika, inhibitorów DPP-4, inhibitorów kotransportera sodowo-glukozowego – SGLT-2, czy antagonisty PPAR-gamma. Drugim etapem jest leczenie lekami doustnymi lub antagonistami receptora GLP-1 (glukagonopodobny peptyd-1). Trzeci etap obejmuje zmianę stylu życia, insulinoterapię prostą i ewentualnie kontynuację podawania metforminy lub innych leków doustnych, bądź antagonisty receptora GLP-1. Etap 4 natomiast charakteryzuje się postępowaniami wymienionymi w etapie 3, natomiast insulinoterapię prostą zamienia się na złożoną. W przypadku nadmiernego zaburzenia struktury komórek β trzustki może okazać się konieczne zwiększenie intensywności leczenia i wprowadzenie insuliny [3].

Do elementów leczenia cukrzycy należy również postępowanie żywieniowe. Osoby chore na cukrzycę powinny stosować się do zasad prawidłowego żywienia oraz dodatkowo spożywać regularnie posiłki, ograniczać spożywanie węglowodanów prostych i łatwo przyswajalnych do minimum oraz wybierać produkty o niskim indeksie glikemicznym (IG). Niezwykle ważna jest odpowiednia podaż błonnika pokarmowego, która powinna wynosić około 20–40 g dziennie. W diecie chorego na cukrzycę należy ograniczać także spożycie nasyconych kwasów tłuszczowych, soli oraz nie zaleca się konsumpcji alkoholu [42]. Warto zaznaczyć, że zalecenia żywieniowe w cukrzycy sprzyjają zachowaniu prawidłowej mikrobioty jelit oraz obniżają ryzyko wystąpienia dysbiozy jelitowej [15, 27].

7. Mikrobiota jelitowa a cukrzyca typu 1 i 2

Mikrobiota jelitowa odgrywa kluczową rolę w chorobach metabolicznych. U osób otyłych oraz chorych na cukrzycę stwierdzono zmiany w proporcjach Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes i Proteobacteria. W przeciwieństwie do osób zdrowych, u chorych na cukrzycę odnotowuje się mniej bakterii wytwarzających maślan, takich jak R. intestinalis i F. prausnitzii, oraz podwyższoną liczebność Proteobacteria, Lactobacillus gasseri, Streptococcus mutans i niektórych szczepów Clostridium [28, 38].

W badaniu obejmującym 30 osób otyłych, u 7 badanych mających cukrzycę typu 2 wykazano mniejszą liczebność bakterii Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, czyli działających protekcyjnie i przeciwzapalnie mikroorganizmów gromady Firmicutes. Po przeprowadzeniu operacji bariatrycznej wzrosła liczba wymienionych bakterii u tych pacjentów. Jednak liczebność F. prausnitzii nadal była obniżona w porównaniu do zdrowych osób. Zaobserwowano także obniżenie stężenia glukozy, insuliny, HbA1c we krwi oraz wzrost insulinowrażliwości. Wynik ten oszacowano na podstawie testu HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance). Zmniejszyło się również stężenie markerów stanu zapalnego (CRP i IL-6) [12]. W badaniu Larsen i wsp. [17] dokonano analizy składu mikrobiomu 36 osób. W grupie badanej 18 osób miało cukrzycę typu 2. Masa ciała badanych była zróżnicowana. Zaobserwowano zmniejszoną liczbę Firmicutes oraz Clostridia w przewodzie pokarmowym chorych na cukrzycę typu 2. Dowiedziono również, że proporcja między Bacteroidetes i Firmicutes wiązała się ze stężeniem glukozy we krwi niezależnie od wartości BMI.

Wśród osób z wczesnym stadium insulinooporności odnotowano dominującą liczebność bakterii rodzaju Proteobacteria, co uznano za marker diagnostyczny rozwijającej się cukrzycy [2]. Zmniejszenie liczebności Akkermansia muciniphila i Faecalibacterium prausnitzii i Verrucomicrobiae również łączyło się z pogorszoną insulinowrażliwością [44]. W badaniu Vrieze i wsp. [40] udowodniono, że po przeniesieniu próbki kału od osób szczupłych do przewodu pokarmowego chorujących na cukrzycę typu 2, liczba bakterii produkujących kwas masłowy wzrosła, w efekcie czego poprawiła się wrażliwość na insulinę.

Stan zapalny inicjowany przez endotoksemię, a w szczególności przez prozapalny element zewnętrznej części błony komórkowej bakterii Gram-ujemnych, czyli lipopolisacharyd, sprzyja rozwojowi cukrzycy typu 2. W wyniku nasilenia insulinooporności oraz podwyższenia glikemii na czczo endotoksemia zwiększa ryzyko zachorowania na cukrzycę typu 2 [9]. W badaniu Creely i wsp. [10] oznaczono stężenie LPS w osoczu osób zdrowych oraz chorych na cukrzycę typu 2. Wynik oznaczenia LPS u osób z cukrzycą typu 2 był wyższy w porównaniu do osób zdrowych. Ponadto, uważa się, że dożylne podanie LPS myszom jest czynnikiem przyczyniający się do wystąpienia u nich otyłości oraz oporności na insulinę. Natomiast u ludzi dieta wysoko energetyczna i wysokotłuszczowa powoduje wzrost stężenia lipopolisacharydów w organizmie wskutek zwiększonej kolonizacji jelita drobnoustrojami zawierającymi tę endotoksynę [6]. U myszy ze zmodyfikowanymi genami CD14/TLR-4 nie zaobserwowano zmian związanych ze stosowaniem diety bogatotłuszczowej. Były one także oporne na działanie lipopolisacharydów, co wiązało się z mniejszą ekspresją szlaków immunologicznych w wątrobie [9, 26, 35].

Białko wiążące lipopolisacharyd (lipopolysaccaride binding protein, LBP) jest białkiem ostrej fazy powstającym w wątrobie i krążącym w krwioobiegu. LBP rozpoznaje LPS i wzmacnia odpowiedź immunologiczną gospodarza. Poziom LBP jest podwyższony u osób z nieprawidłową tolerancją glukozy i może być markerem zapalenia związanym z insulinoopornością współistniejącą z otyłością [31]. W badaniu Sun i wsp. [37] udowodniono, że wzrost stężenia LBP we krwi jest związany z otyłością, cukrzycą typu 2 i nowotworami.

Wykazano, że wzrost liczby Bifidobacterium spp. prowadził do zmniejszenia stanu zapalnego u otyłych myszy poprzez zwiększenie wytwarzania GLP-1. Zmniejszyła się także przepuszczalność jelit. Zwiększenie liczebności Bifidobacterium spp. wiąże się również ze wzrostem wydzielania peptydu YY przez jelita. Zarówno GLP-1, jak i peptyd YY poprawiają funkcjonowanie komórek β trzustki oraz obniżają insulinooporność [18, 26, 39].

Mikrobiota jelitowa wpływa na rozwój insulinooporności i cukrzycy również poprzez tworzenie wtórnych kwasów żółciowych oraz ich metabolizm. Z kolei te w wyniku aktywacji m.in. FXR (receptor farnezoidowy X) i TGR5 (receptor błonowy sprzężony z białkiem G) uczestniczą w metabolizmie glukozy, lipidów i w regulacji insulinowrażliwości. Wykazano, że pacjenci z cukrzycą typu 2 mają obniżone stężenie wtórnych kwasów żółciowych [18, 23].

Różnice w składzie mikrobioty chorych na cukrzycę typu 1 i osób zdrowych są zauważalne jeszcze przed wystąpieniem objawów klinicznych choroby. Podejrzewa się, że interakcje mikrobiomu jelitowego z układem odpornościowym są związane ze zwiększoną predyspozycją do zachorowania na cukrzycę typu 1. W badaniu Wen i wsp. [41] przetestowano udział TLRs, białka MyD88 i bakterii jelitowych. Analiza objęła myszy, u których komórki β trzustki ulegały destrukcji poprzez aktywowane komórki układu immunologicznego. Receptory TLRs rozpoznające infekcje bakteryjne, są odpowiedzialne za reakcje odpornościowe przeciw patogenom. Białko MyD88 jest wykorzystywane przez TLRs i bierze udział w odpowiedzi odpornościowej. Wykazano, że u gryzoni modelu NOD (non-obese diabetic) pozbawionych białka MyD88 nie występowały zachorowania na cukrzycę typu 1, natomiast objawy chorobowe obserwowano u myszy GF (germ free) pozbawionych białka MyD88. Kolonizacja przewodu pokarmowego myszy kilkoma rodzajami bakterii ludzkiej mikrobioty prowadziło do stłumienia objawów T1D (cukrzyca typu 1 ). Odnotowane zmiany w składzie mikrobioty jelit były powiązane z eliminacją białka MyD88. Transplantacja drobnoustrojów jelitowych myszy niechorujących na cukrzycę typu 1 (model NOD bez białka MyD88) do przewodu pokarmowego myszy GF tego samego modelu (chorujące na cukrzycę typu 1) prowadziło do osłabienia objawów klinicznych.

W patogenezie T1D zwraca się uwagę na udział limfocytów pomocniczych T typu 17 (T helper type 17, Th17) oraz nieprawidłowych limfocytów regulatorowych T (T regulatory, Treg). Uznaje się, że przyczyną zaburzeń równowagi między limfocytami Th17 i Treg może być zmiana mikrobioty jelitowej [8]. Ponadto, w badaniu Peng i wsp. [30] dowiedziono, że zaburzenia ilościowe i jakościowe bakterii jelitowych mogą obniżać odporność błony śluzowej jelit i nasilać proces autoimmunizacji. Regulatorowe komórki T CD8 mogą wpływać na rozwój dysbiozy jelitowej i w konsekwencji cukrzycy typu 1. Analiza Pellegrini i wsp. [29] wykazała, że w porównaniu z grupą chorych na celiakię i zdrowych osób z grupy kontrolnej w przebiegu T1D w błonie śluzowej dwunastnicy profil mediatorów zapalnych oraz zaburzenia mikrobiomu są swoiste dla tej choroby.

8. Podsumowanie

W ostatnich latach obserwuje się tendencję wzrostową zachorowań na cukrzycę. Podkreśla się rolę mikrobioty jelitowej w patogenezie zaburzeń metabolicznych. Mikrobiom wpływa na ich rozwój w wielu różnych mechanizmach, m.in. poprzez indukcję stanu zapalnego przez endotoksemię, czy tworzenie wtórnych kwasów tłuszczowych. Obserwuje się znaczące zmiany w składzie drobnoustrojów jelitowych u pacjentów z insulinoopornością i cukrzycą w porównaniu z mikrobiomem osób zdrowych. Korelacja mikrobioty jelitowej i cukrzycy nie jest jednak wystarczająco udowodniona. Istnieje zatem konieczność potwierdzenia wpływu mikroorganizmów jelitowych człowieka na patogenezę zaburzeń metabolicznych w wieloośrodkowych badaniach, które obejmowałyby dużą grupę badaną. Ważne jest wykazanie czy modyfikacje w składzie mikrobioty przyczyniają się do wystąpienia cukrzycy czy są jedynie skutkiem choroby lub wieloletniego nieprawidłowego sposobu odżywiania. Przyszłe badania powinny być zorientowane na ustalanie czy modulacja mikrobioty jelitowej może stanowić jeden z celów leczenia żywieniowego lub farmakologicznego w przypadku leczenia cukrzycy.

References


  1. Agans R., Rigsbee L., Kenche H., Michail S., Khamis H.J., Paliy O.: Distal gut microbiota of adolescent children is different from that of adults. FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 77, 404–412 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  2. Amar J., Serino M., Lange C., Chabo C., Iacovoni J., Mondot S., Lepage P., Klopp C., Mariette J., Bouchez O.: et al. Involvement of tissue bacteria in the onset of diabetes in humans: evidence for a concept. Diabetologia, 54, 3055–3061 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  3. Araszkiewicz A., Bandurska-Stankiewicz E., Borys S., Budzyński A., Cyganek K., Cypryk K., Czech A., Czupryniak L., Drzewoski J., Dzida G.: et al. Zalecenia kliniczne dotyczące postępowania u chorych na cukrzycę 2021–Stanowisko Polskiego Towarzystwa Diabetologicznego. Diabetol. Prakt. 10, 1–119 (2021)
  4. Barko P., McMichael M., Swanson K.S., Williams D.A.: The gastrointestinal microbiome: a review. J. Vet. Intern. Med. 32, 9–25 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  5. Bik E.M., Eckburg P.B., Gill S.R., Nelson K.E., Purdom E.A., Francois F., Perez-Perez G., Blaser M.J., Relman D.A.: Molecular analysis of the bacterial microbiota in the human stomach. P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 103, 732–737 (2006)
    [CROSSREF]
  6. Cani P.D., Amar J., Iglesias M.A., Poggi M., Knauf C., Bastelica D., Neyrinck A.M., Fava F., Tuohy K.M., Chabo C.: et al. Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance. Diabetes, 56, 1761–1772 (2007)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  7. Chwalba A., Otto-Buczkowska E.: Participation of the microbiome in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Clinical Diabetology, 6, 178–181 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  8. Chwalba A., Otto-Buczkowska E.: Udział flory jelitowej w patogenezie cukrzycy. Varia Medica, 2, 1–5 (2018)
    [CROSSREF]
  9. Clemente-Postigo M., Queipo-Ortuño M.I., Murri M., Boto-Ordoñez M., Perez-Martinez P., Andres-Lacueva C., Cardona F., Tinahones F.J.: Endotoxin increase after fat overload is related to postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in morbidly obese patients. J. Lipid. Res. 53, 973–978 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  10. Creely S.J., McTernan P.G., Kusminski C.M., Fisher f M., Da Silva N.F., Khanolkar M., Evans M., Harte A.L., Kumar S.: Lipopolysaccharide activates an innate immune system response in human adipose tissue in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab. 292, E740–747 (2007)
    [CROSSREF]
  11. Eckburg P.B., Bik E.M., Bernstein C.N., Purdom E., Dethlefsen L., Sargent M., Gill S.R., Nelson K.E., Relman D.A.: Diversity of the human intestinal microbial flora. Science, 308, 1635–1638 (2005)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  12. Furet J.P., Kong L.C., Tap J., Poitou C., Basdevant A., Bouillot J.L., Mariat D., Corthier G., Doré J., Henegar C.: et al. Differential adaptation of human gut microbiota to bariatric surgery-induced weight loss: links with metabolic and low-grade inflammation markers. Diabetes, 59, 3049–3057 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  13. Gałęcka M., Bartnicka A., Basińska A.: Znaczenie mikrobioty jelitowej w kształtowaniu zdrowia człowieka–implikacje w praktyce lekarza rodzinnego. The importance of intestinal microbiota in shaping human health–implications in the practice of the family physician. Forum Medycyny Rodzinnej, 12, 50–59 (2018)
  14. Górska-Ciebiada M., Loba M., Barylski M., Ciebiada M.: Rozpoznawanie i leczenie cukrzycy–co nowego w wytycznych Polskiego Towarzystwa Diabetologicznego? The recognition and the treatment of diabetes mellitus according to new recommendations of Polish Diabetes Association. Geriatria, 10, 112–119 (2016)
  15. Karwowska Z., Majchrzak K.: wpływ błonnika na zróżnicowanie mikroflory jelitowej (mikrobiota jelit). Bromat. Chem. Toksykol.–XLVIII, 4, 701–709 (2015)
  16. Krakowiak O., Nowak R.: Mikroflora przewodu pokarmowego człowieka–znaczenie, rozwój, modyfikacje. Post. Fitoter. 3, 193–200 (2015)
  17. Larsen N., Vogensen F.K., van den Berg F.W., Nielsen D.S., Andreasen A.S., Pedersen B.K., Al-Soud W.A., Sørensen S.J., Hansen L.H., Jakobsen M.: Gut microbiota in human adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adults. PLoS. One. 5, e9085 (2010)
  18. Majewska K., Smolarek I., Jabłecka A.: Mikroflora przewodu pokarmowego i jej rola w patogenezie cukrzycy typu 2. Farmacja Współczesna, 10, 158–162 (2017)
  19. Malinowska M., Tokarz-Deptula B., Deptula W.: Mikrobiom człowieka. Postep. Mikrobiol. 56, (2017)
  20. Marlicz W., Łoniewski I.: Mikroflora jelitowa a otyłość i rak jelita grubego. Gastroenterologia Kliniczna. Postępy i Standardy, 4, 69–78 (2012)
  21. Marlicz W., Ostrowska L., Łoniewski I.: Flora bakteryjna jelit i jej potencjalny związek z otyłością. Endokrynologia, Otyłość i Zaburzenia Przemiany Materii, 9, 20–28 (2013)
  22. Mroczyńska M., Libudzisz Z., Gałęcka M., Szachta P.: Mikroorganizmy jelitowe człowieka i ich aktywność metaboliczna. Prz. Gastroenterol. 6, (2011)
  23. Muñoz-Garach A., Diaz-Perdigones C., Tinahones F.J.: Gut microbiota and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Endocrinol. Nutr. 63, 560–568 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  24. NFZ: NFZ o zdrowiu. Cukrzyca. Narodowy Fundusz Zdrowia, (2019)
  25. Nowak A., Libudzisz Z.: Mikroorganizmy jelitowe człowieka. Standardy Medyczne–Pediatria, 5, 372–379 (2008)
  26. Ortega M.A., Fraile-Martínez O., Naya I., García-Honduvilla N., Álvarez-Mon M., Buján J., Asúnsolo Á., de la Torre B.: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Associated with Obesity (Diabesity). The Central Role of Gut Microbiota and Its Translational Applications. Nutrients, 12, 2749 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  27. Ostrowska L., Smarkusz J.: Modyfikacja mikroflory jelitowej sposobem zapobiegania lub leczenia otyłości i schorzeń metabolicznych? Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych, 7, 53–61 (2016)
  28. Palau-Rodriguez M., Tulipani S., Isabel Queipo-Ortuño M., Urpi-Sarda M., Tinahones F.J., Andres-Lacueva C.: Metabolomic insights into the intricate gut microbial-host interaction in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Front. Microbiol. 6, 1151–1151 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  29. Pellegrini S., Sordi V., Bolla A.M., Saita D., Ferrarese R., Canducci F., Clementi M., Invernizzi F., Mariani A., Bonfanti R.: et al. Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Shows Distinctive Inflammatory Profile and Microbiota. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 102, 1468–1477 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  30. Peng J., Narasimhan S., Marchesi J.R., Benson A., Wong F.S., Wen L.: Long term effect of gut microbiota transfer on diabetes development. J. Autoimmun. 53, 85–94 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  31. Pitocco D., Di Leo M., Tartaglione L., De Leva F., Petruzziello C., Saviano A., Pontecorvi A., Ojetti V.: The role of gut microbiota in mediating obesity and diabetes mellitus. Eur. Rev. Med. Pharmacol. Sci. 24, 1548–1562 (2020)
    [PUBMED]
  32. Pokrzywnicka P., Gumprecht J.: Mikrobiota i jej związek z cukrzycą typu 2 i otyłością. Diabetologia Praktyczna, 2, 190–199 (2016)
  33. Qin J., Li Y., Cai Z., Shenghui L., Zhu J., Zhang F., Liang S., Zhang W., Guan Y., Shen D.: et al. A metagenome-wide association study of gut microbiota in type 2 diabetes. Nature, 490, 55–60 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  34. Rychter A., Skoracka K., Skrypnik D.: Wpływ diety zachodniej na przepuszczalność bariery jelitowej. In: Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych, 88–97 (2019)
  35. Shi H., Kokoeva M.V., Inouye K., Tzameli I., Yin H., Flier J.S.: TLR4 links innate immunity and fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. J. Clin. Invest. 116, 3015–3025 (2006)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  36. Skonieczna-Żydecka K., Loniewski I., Maciejewska D., Marlicz W.: Intestinal microbiota and nutrients as determinants of nervous system function. Part I. Gastrointestinal microbiota. Aktualności Neurologiczne, 17, 181–188 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  37. Sun L., Yu Z., Ye X., Zou S., Li H., Yu D., Wu H., Chen Y., Dore J., Clément K.: et al. A marker of endotoxemia is associated with obesity and related metabolic disorders in apparently healthy Chinese. Diabetes Care, 33, 1925–1932 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  38. Tilg H., Moschen A.R.: Microbiota and diabetes: an evolving relationship. Gut, 63, 1513–1521 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  39. Velasquez-Manoff M.: Gut microbiome: the peacekeepers. Nature, 518, S3–11 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  40. Vrieze A., Van Nood E., Holleman F., Salojärvi J., Kootte R.S., Bartelsman J.F., Dallinga-Thie G.M., Ackermans M.T., Serlie M.J., Oozeer R.: et al. Transfer of intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Gastroenterology, 143, 913–916.e917 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  41. Wen L., Ley R.E., Volchkov P.Y., Stranges P.B., Avanesyan L., Stonebraker A.C., Hu C., Wong F.S., Szot G.L., Bluestone J.A.: et al. Innate immunity and intestinal microbiota in the development of Type 1 diabetes. Nature, 455, 1109–1113 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  42. Włodarek D., Lange E., Głąbska D., Kozłowska L.: Dietoterapia: Wydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWL, 2015.
  43. Wołkowicz T., Januszkiewicz A., Szych J.: Mikrobiom przewodu pokarmowego i jego dysbiozy jako istotny czynnik wpływający na kondycję zdrowotną organizmu człowieka. Med. Dośw. Mikrobiol. 66, 223–235 (2014)
    [PUBMED]
  44. Zhang X., Shen D., Fang Z., Jie Z., Qiu X., Zhang C., Chen Y., Ji L.: Human gut microbiota changes reveal the progression of glucose intolerance. PLoS One, 8, e71108 (2013)
  45. Ziarno M.: Znaczenie aktywnoœci hydrolazy soli żółci u bakterii z rodzaju Bifidobacterium. Post. Mikrobiol. 43, 285–296 (2004)
  46. Agans R., Rigsbee L., Kenche H., Michail S., Khamis H.J., Paliy O.: Distal gut microbiota of adolescent children is different from that of adults. FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 77, 404–412 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  47. Amar J., Serino M., Lange C., Chabo C., Iacovoni J., Mondot S., Lepage P., Klopp C., Mariette J., Bouchez O.: et al. Involvement of tissue bacteria in the onset of diabetes in humans: evidence for a concept. Diabetologia, 54, 3055–3061 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  48. Araszkiewicz A., Bandurska-Stankiewicz E., Borys S., Budzyński A., Cyganek K., Cypryk K., Czech A., Czupryniak L., Drzewoski J., Dzida G.: et al. Zalecenia kliniczne dotyczące postępowania u chorych na cukrzycę 2021–Stanowisko Polskiego Towarzystwa Diabetologicznego. Diabetol. Prakt. 10, 1–119 (2021)
  49. Barko P., McMichael M., Swanson K.S., Williams D.A.: The gastrointestinal microbiome: a review. J. Vet. Intern. Med. 32, 9–25 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  50. Bik E.M., Eckburg P.B., Gill S.R., Nelson K.E., Purdom E.A., Francois F., Perez-Perez G., Blaser M.J., Relman D.A.: Molecular analysis of the bacterial microbiota in the human stomach. P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 103, 732–737 (2006)
    [CROSSREF]
  51. Cani P.D., Amar J., Iglesias M.A., Poggi M., Knauf C., Bastelica D., Neyrinck A.M., Fava F., Tuohy K.M., Chabo C.: et al. Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance. Diabetes, 56, 1761–1772 (2007)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  52. Chwalba A., Otto-Buczkowska E.: Participation of the microbiome in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Clinical Diabetology, 6, 178–181 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  53. Chwalba A., Otto-Buczkowska E.: Udział flory jelitowej w patogenezie cukrzycy. Varia Medica, 2, 1–5 (2018)
    [CROSSREF]
  54. Clemente-Postigo M., Queipo-Ortuño M.I., Murri M., Boto-Ordoñez M., Perez-Martinez P., Andres-Lacueva C., Cardona F., Tinahones F.J.: Endotoxin increase after fat overload is related to postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in morbidly obese patients. J. Lipid. Res. 53, 973–978 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  55. Creely S.J., McTernan P.G., Kusminski C.M., Fisher f M., Da Silva N.F., Khanolkar M., Evans M., Harte A.L., Kumar S.: Lipopolysaccharide activates an innate immune system response in human adipose tissue in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab. 292, E740–747 (2007)
    [CROSSREF]
  56. Eckburg P.B., Bik E.M., Bernstein C.N., Purdom E., Dethlefsen L., Sargent M., Gill S.R., Nelson K.E., Relman D.A.: Diversity of the human intestinal microbial flora. Science, 308, 1635–1638 (2005)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  57. Furet J.P., Kong L.C., Tap J., Poitou C., Basdevant A., Bouillot J.L., Mariat D., Corthier G., Doré J., Henegar C.: et al. Differential adaptation of human gut microbiota to bariatric surgery-induced weight loss: links with metabolic and low-grade inflammation markers. Diabetes, 59, 3049–3057 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  58. Gałęcka M., Bartnicka A., Basińska A.: Znaczenie mikrobioty jelitowej w kształtowaniu zdrowia człowieka–implikacje w praktyce lekarza rodzinnego. The importance of intestinal microbiota in shaping human health–implications in the practice of the family physician. Forum Medycyny Rodzinnej, 12, 50–59 (2018)
  59. Górska-Ciebiada M., Loba M., Barylski M., Ciebiada M.: Rozpoznawanie i leczenie cukrzycy–co nowego w wytycznych Polskiego Towarzystwa Diabetologicznego? The recognition and the treatment of diabetes mellitus according to new recommendations of Polish Diabetes Association. Geriatria, 10, 112–119 (2016)
  60. Karwowska Z., Majchrzak K.: wpływ błonnika na zróżnicowanie mikroflory jelitowej (mikrobiota jelit). Bromat. Chem. Toksykol.–XLVIII, 4, 701–709 (2015)
  61. Krakowiak O., Nowak R.: Mikroflora przewodu pokarmowego człowieka–znaczenie, rozwój, modyfikacje. Post. Fitoter. 3, 193–200 (2015)
  62. Larsen N., Vogensen F.K., van den Berg F.W., Nielsen D.S., Andreasen A.S., Pedersen B.K., Al-Soud W.A., Sørensen S.J., Hansen L.H., Jakobsen M.: Gut microbiota in human adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adults. PLoS. One, 5, e9085 (2010)
  63. Majewska K., Smolarek I., Jabłecka A.: Mikroflora przewodu pokarmowego i jej rola w patogenezie cukrzycy typu 2. Farmacja Współczesna, 10, 158–162 (2017)
  64. Malinowska M., Tokarz-Deptula B., Deptula W.: Mikrobiom człowieka. Postep. Mikrobiol. 56, (2017)
  65. Marlicz W., Łoniewski I.: Mikroflora jelitowa a otyłość i rak jelita grubego. Gastroenterologia Kliniczna. Postępy i Standardy, 4, 69–78 (2012)
  66. Marlicz W., Ostrowska L., Łoniewski I.: Flora bakteryjna jelit i jej potencjalny związek z otyłością. Endokrynologia, Otyłość i Zaburzenia Przemiany Materii, 9, 20–28 (2013)
  67. Mroczyńska M., Libudzisz Z., Gałęcka M., Szachta P.: Mikroorganizmy jelitowe człowieka i ich aktywność metaboliczna. Prz. Gastroenterol. 6, (2011)
  68. Muñoz-Garach A., Diaz-Perdigones C., Tinahones F.J.: Gut microbiota and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Endocrinol. Nutr. 63, 560–568 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  69. NFZ: NFZ o zdrowiu. Cukrzyca. Narodowy Fundusz Zdrowia, (2019)
  70. Nowak A., Libudzisz Z.: Mikroorganizmy jelitowe człowieka. Standardy Medyczne–Pediatria, 5, 372–379 (2008)
  71. Ortega M.A., Fraile-Martínez O., Naya I., García-Honduvilla N., Álvarez-Mon M., Buján J., Asúnsolo Á., de la Torre B.: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Associated with Obesity (Diabesity). The Central Role of Gut Microbiota and Its Translational Applications. Nutrients, 12, 2749 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  72. Ostrowska L., Smarkusz J.: Modyfikacja mikroflory jelitowej sposobem zapobiegania lub leczenia otyłości i schorzeń metabolicznych? Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych, 7, 53–61 (2016)
  73. Palau-Rodriguez M., Tulipani S., Isabel Queipo-Ortuño M., Urpi-Sarda M., Tinahones F.J., Andres-Lacueva C.: Metabolomic insights into the intricate gut microbial-host interaction in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Front. Microbiol. 6, 1151–1151 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  74. Pellegrini S., Sordi V., Bolla A.M., Saita D., Ferrarese R., Canducci F., Clementi M., Invernizzi F., Mariani A., Bonfanti R.: et al. Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Shows Distinctive Inflammatory Profile and Microbiota. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 102, 1468–1477 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  75. Peng J., Narasimhan S., Marchesi J.R., Benson A., Wong F.S., Wen L.: Long term effect of gut microbiota transfer on diabetes development. J. Autoimmun. 53, 85–94 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  76. Pitocco D., Di Leo M., Tartaglione L., De Leva F., Petruzziello C., Saviano A., Pontecorvi A., Ojetti V.: The role of gut microbiota in mediating obesity and diabetes mellitus. Eur. Rev. Med. Pharmacol. Sci. 24, 1548–1562 (2020)
    [PUBMED]
  77. Pokrzywnicka P., Gumprecht J.: Mikrobiota i jej związek z cukrzycą typu 2 i otyłością. Diabetologia Praktyczna, 2, 190–199 (2016)
  78. Qin J., Li Y., Cai Z., Shenghui L., Zhu J., Zhang F., Liang S., Zhang W., Guan Y., Shen D.: et al. A metagenome-wide association study of gut microbiota in type 2 diabetes. Nature, 490, 55–60 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  79. Rychter A., Skoracka K., Skrypnik D.: Wpływ diety zachodniej na przepuszczalność bariery jelitowej. In: Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych, 88–97 (2019)
  80. Shi H., Kokoeva M.V., Inouye K., Tzameli I., Yin H., Flier J.S.: TLR4 links innate immunity and fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. J. Clin. Invest. 116, 3015–3025 (2006)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  81. Skonieczna-Żydecka K., Loniewski I., Maciejewska D., Marlicz W.: Intestinal microbiota and nutrients as determinants of nervous system function. Part I. Gastrointestinal microbiota. Aktualności Neurologiczne, 17, 181–188 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  82. Sun L., Yu Z., Ye X., Zou S., Li H., Yu D., Wu H., Chen Y., Dore J., Clément K.: et al. A marker of endotoxemia is associated with obesity and related metabolic disorders in apparently healthy Chinese. Diabetes Care, 33, 1925–1932 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  83. Tilg H., Moschen A.R.: Microbiota and diabetes: an evolving relationship. Gut, 63, 1513–1521 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  84. Velasquez-Manoff M.: Gut microbiome: the peacekeepers. Nature, 518, S3–11 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  85. Vrieze A., Van Nood E., Holleman F., Salojärvi J., Kootte R.S., Bartelsman J.F., Dallinga-Thie G.M., Ackermans M.T., Serlie M.J., Oozeer R.: et al. Transfer of intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Gastroenterology, 143, 913–916.e917 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  86. Wen L., Ley R.E., Volchkov P.Y., Stranges P.B., Avanesyan L., Stonebraker A.C., Hu C., Wong F.S., Szot G.L., Bluestone J.A.: et al. Innate immunity and intestinal microbiota in the development of Type 1 diabetes. Nature, 455, 1109–1113 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  87. Włodarek D., Lange E., Głąbska D., Kozłowska L.: Dietoterapia: Wyd. Lekarskie PZWL, 2015.
  88. Wołkowicz T., Januszkiewicz A., Szych J.: Mikrobiom przewodu pokarmowego i jego dysbiozy jako istotny czynnik wpływający na kondycję zdrowotną organizmu człowieka. Med. Dośw. Mikrobiol. 66, 223–235 (2014)
    [PUBMED]
  89. Zhang X., Shen D., Fang Z., Jie Z., Qiu X., Zhang C., Chen Y., Ji L.: Human gut microbiota changes reveal the progression of glucose intolerance. PLoS One, 8, e71108 (2013)
  90. Ziarno M.: Znaczenie aktywności hydrolazy soli żółci u bakterii z rodzaju Bifidobacterium. Post. Mikrobiol. 43, 285–296 (2004)
XML PDF Share

FIGURES & TABLES

REFERENCES

  1. Agans R., Rigsbee L., Kenche H., Michail S., Khamis H.J., Paliy O.: Distal gut microbiota of adolescent children is different from that of adults. FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 77, 404–412 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  2. Amar J., Serino M., Lange C., Chabo C., Iacovoni J., Mondot S., Lepage P., Klopp C., Mariette J., Bouchez O.: et al. Involvement of tissue bacteria in the onset of diabetes in humans: evidence for a concept. Diabetologia, 54, 3055–3061 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  3. Araszkiewicz A., Bandurska-Stankiewicz E., Borys S., Budzyński A., Cyganek K., Cypryk K., Czech A., Czupryniak L., Drzewoski J., Dzida G.: et al. Zalecenia kliniczne dotyczące postępowania u chorych na cukrzycę 2021–Stanowisko Polskiego Towarzystwa Diabetologicznego. Diabetol. Prakt. 10, 1–119 (2021)
  4. Barko P., McMichael M., Swanson K.S., Williams D.A.: The gastrointestinal microbiome: a review. J. Vet. Intern. Med. 32, 9–25 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  5. Bik E.M., Eckburg P.B., Gill S.R., Nelson K.E., Purdom E.A., Francois F., Perez-Perez G., Blaser M.J., Relman D.A.: Molecular analysis of the bacterial microbiota in the human stomach. P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 103, 732–737 (2006)
    [CROSSREF]
  6. Cani P.D., Amar J., Iglesias M.A., Poggi M., Knauf C., Bastelica D., Neyrinck A.M., Fava F., Tuohy K.M., Chabo C.: et al. Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance. Diabetes, 56, 1761–1772 (2007)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  7. Chwalba A., Otto-Buczkowska E.: Participation of the microbiome in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Clinical Diabetology, 6, 178–181 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  8. Chwalba A., Otto-Buczkowska E.: Udział flory jelitowej w patogenezie cukrzycy. Varia Medica, 2, 1–5 (2018)
    [CROSSREF]
  9. Clemente-Postigo M., Queipo-Ortuño M.I., Murri M., Boto-Ordoñez M., Perez-Martinez P., Andres-Lacueva C., Cardona F., Tinahones F.J.: Endotoxin increase after fat overload is related to postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in morbidly obese patients. J. Lipid. Res. 53, 973–978 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  10. Creely S.J., McTernan P.G., Kusminski C.M., Fisher f M., Da Silva N.F., Khanolkar M., Evans M., Harte A.L., Kumar S.: Lipopolysaccharide activates an innate immune system response in human adipose tissue in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab. 292, E740–747 (2007)
    [CROSSREF]
  11. Eckburg P.B., Bik E.M., Bernstein C.N., Purdom E., Dethlefsen L., Sargent M., Gill S.R., Nelson K.E., Relman D.A.: Diversity of the human intestinal microbial flora. Science, 308, 1635–1638 (2005)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  12. Furet J.P., Kong L.C., Tap J., Poitou C., Basdevant A., Bouillot J.L., Mariat D., Corthier G., Doré J., Henegar C.: et al. Differential adaptation of human gut microbiota to bariatric surgery-induced weight loss: links with metabolic and low-grade inflammation markers. Diabetes, 59, 3049–3057 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  13. Gałęcka M., Bartnicka A., Basińska A.: Znaczenie mikrobioty jelitowej w kształtowaniu zdrowia człowieka–implikacje w praktyce lekarza rodzinnego. The importance of intestinal microbiota in shaping human health–implications in the practice of the family physician. Forum Medycyny Rodzinnej, 12, 50–59 (2018)
  14. Górska-Ciebiada M., Loba M., Barylski M., Ciebiada M.: Rozpoznawanie i leczenie cukrzycy–co nowego w wytycznych Polskiego Towarzystwa Diabetologicznego? The recognition and the treatment of diabetes mellitus according to new recommendations of Polish Diabetes Association. Geriatria, 10, 112–119 (2016)
  15. Karwowska Z., Majchrzak K.: wpływ błonnika na zróżnicowanie mikroflory jelitowej (mikrobiota jelit). Bromat. Chem. Toksykol.–XLVIII, 4, 701–709 (2015)
  16. Krakowiak O., Nowak R.: Mikroflora przewodu pokarmowego człowieka–znaczenie, rozwój, modyfikacje. Post. Fitoter. 3, 193–200 (2015)
  17. Larsen N., Vogensen F.K., van den Berg F.W., Nielsen D.S., Andreasen A.S., Pedersen B.K., Al-Soud W.A., Sørensen S.J., Hansen L.H., Jakobsen M.: Gut microbiota in human adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adults. PLoS. One. 5, e9085 (2010)
  18. Majewska K., Smolarek I., Jabłecka A.: Mikroflora przewodu pokarmowego i jej rola w patogenezie cukrzycy typu 2. Farmacja Współczesna, 10, 158–162 (2017)
  19. Malinowska M., Tokarz-Deptula B., Deptula W.: Mikrobiom człowieka. Postep. Mikrobiol. 56, (2017)
  20. Marlicz W., Łoniewski I.: Mikroflora jelitowa a otyłość i rak jelita grubego. Gastroenterologia Kliniczna. Postępy i Standardy, 4, 69–78 (2012)
  21. Marlicz W., Ostrowska L., Łoniewski I.: Flora bakteryjna jelit i jej potencjalny związek z otyłością. Endokrynologia, Otyłość i Zaburzenia Przemiany Materii, 9, 20–28 (2013)
  22. Mroczyńska M., Libudzisz Z., Gałęcka M., Szachta P.: Mikroorganizmy jelitowe człowieka i ich aktywność metaboliczna. Prz. Gastroenterol. 6, (2011)
  23. Muñoz-Garach A., Diaz-Perdigones C., Tinahones F.J.: Gut microbiota and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Endocrinol. Nutr. 63, 560–568 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  24. NFZ: NFZ o zdrowiu. Cukrzyca. Narodowy Fundusz Zdrowia, (2019)
  25. Nowak A., Libudzisz Z.: Mikroorganizmy jelitowe człowieka. Standardy Medyczne–Pediatria, 5, 372–379 (2008)
  26. Ortega M.A., Fraile-Martínez O., Naya I., García-Honduvilla N., Álvarez-Mon M., Buján J., Asúnsolo Á., de la Torre B.: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Associated with Obesity (Diabesity). The Central Role of Gut Microbiota and Its Translational Applications. Nutrients, 12, 2749 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  27. Ostrowska L., Smarkusz J.: Modyfikacja mikroflory jelitowej sposobem zapobiegania lub leczenia otyłości i schorzeń metabolicznych? Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych, 7, 53–61 (2016)
  28. Palau-Rodriguez M., Tulipani S., Isabel Queipo-Ortuño M., Urpi-Sarda M., Tinahones F.J., Andres-Lacueva C.: Metabolomic insights into the intricate gut microbial-host interaction in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Front. Microbiol. 6, 1151–1151 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  29. Pellegrini S., Sordi V., Bolla A.M., Saita D., Ferrarese R., Canducci F., Clementi M., Invernizzi F., Mariani A., Bonfanti R.: et al. Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Shows Distinctive Inflammatory Profile and Microbiota. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 102, 1468–1477 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  30. Peng J., Narasimhan S., Marchesi J.R., Benson A., Wong F.S., Wen L.: Long term effect of gut microbiota transfer on diabetes development. J. Autoimmun. 53, 85–94 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  31. Pitocco D., Di Leo M., Tartaglione L., De Leva F., Petruzziello C., Saviano A., Pontecorvi A., Ojetti V.: The role of gut microbiota in mediating obesity and diabetes mellitus. Eur. Rev. Med. Pharmacol. Sci. 24, 1548–1562 (2020)
    [PUBMED]
  32. Pokrzywnicka P., Gumprecht J.: Mikrobiota i jej związek z cukrzycą typu 2 i otyłością. Diabetologia Praktyczna, 2, 190–199 (2016)
  33. Qin J., Li Y., Cai Z., Shenghui L., Zhu J., Zhang F., Liang S., Zhang W., Guan Y., Shen D.: et al. A metagenome-wide association study of gut microbiota in type 2 diabetes. Nature, 490, 55–60 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  34. Rychter A., Skoracka K., Skrypnik D.: Wpływ diety zachodniej na przepuszczalność bariery jelitowej. In: Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych, 88–97 (2019)
  35. Shi H., Kokoeva M.V., Inouye K., Tzameli I., Yin H., Flier J.S.: TLR4 links innate immunity and fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. J. Clin. Invest. 116, 3015–3025 (2006)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  36. Skonieczna-Żydecka K., Loniewski I., Maciejewska D., Marlicz W.: Intestinal microbiota and nutrients as determinants of nervous system function. Part I. Gastrointestinal microbiota. Aktualności Neurologiczne, 17, 181–188 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  37. Sun L., Yu Z., Ye X., Zou S., Li H., Yu D., Wu H., Chen Y., Dore J., Clément K.: et al. A marker of endotoxemia is associated with obesity and related metabolic disorders in apparently healthy Chinese. Diabetes Care, 33, 1925–1932 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  38. Tilg H., Moschen A.R.: Microbiota and diabetes: an evolving relationship. Gut, 63, 1513–1521 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  39. Velasquez-Manoff M.: Gut microbiome: the peacekeepers. Nature, 518, S3–11 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  40. Vrieze A., Van Nood E., Holleman F., Salojärvi J., Kootte R.S., Bartelsman J.F., Dallinga-Thie G.M., Ackermans M.T., Serlie M.J., Oozeer R.: et al. Transfer of intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Gastroenterology, 143, 913–916.e917 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  41. Wen L., Ley R.E., Volchkov P.Y., Stranges P.B., Avanesyan L., Stonebraker A.C., Hu C., Wong F.S., Szot G.L., Bluestone J.A.: et al. Innate immunity and intestinal microbiota in the development of Type 1 diabetes. Nature, 455, 1109–1113 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  42. Włodarek D., Lange E., Głąbska D., Kozłowska L.: Dietoterapia: Wydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWL, 2015.
  43. Wołkowicz T., Januszkiewicz A., Szych J.: Mikrobiom przewodu pokarmowego i jego dysbiozy jako istotny czynnik wpływający na kondycję zdrowotną organizmu człowieka. Med. Dośw. Mikrobiol. 66, 223–235 (2014)
    [PUBMED]
  44. Zhang X., Shen D., Fang Z., Jie Z., Qiu X., Zhang C., Chen Y., Ji L.: Human gut microbiota changes reveal the progression of glucose intolerance. PLoS One, 8, e71108 (2013)
  45. Ziarno M.: Znaczenie aktywnoœci hydrolazy soli żółci u bakterii z rodzaju Bifidobacterium. Post. Mikrobiol. 43, 285–296 (2004)
  46. Agans R., Rigsbee L., Kenche H., Michail S., Khamis H.J., Paliy O.: Distal gut microbiota of adolescent children is different from that of adults. FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 77, 404–412 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  47. Amar J., Serino M., Lange C., Chabo C., Iacovoni J., Mondot S., Lepage P., Klopp C., Mariette J., Bouchez O.: et al. Involvement of tissue bacteria in the onset of diabetes in humans: evidence for a concept. Diabetologia, 54, 3055–3061 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  48. Araszkiewicz A., Bandurska-Stankiewicz E., Borys S., Budzyński A., Cyganek K., Cypryk K., Czech A., Czupryniak L., Drzewoski J., Dzida G.: et al. Zalecenia kliniczne dotyczące postępowania u chorych na cukrzycę 2021–Stanowisko Polskiego Towarzystwa Diabetologicznego. Diabetol. Prakt. 10, 1–119 (2021)
  49. Barko P., McMichael M., Swanson K.S., Williams D.A.: The gastrointestinal microbiome: a review. J. Vet. Intern. Med. 32, 9–25 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  50. Bik E.M., Eckburg P.B., Gill S.R., Nelson K.E., Purdom E.A., Francois F., Perez-Perez G., Blaser M.J., Relman D.A.: Molecular analysis of the bacterial microbiota in the human stomach. P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 103, 732–737 (2006)
    [CROSSREF]
  51. Cani P.D., Amar J., Iglesias M.A., Poggi M., Knauf C., Bastelica D., Neyrinck A.M., Fava F., Tuohy K.M., Chabo C.: et al. Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance. Diabetes, 56, 1761–1772 (2007)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  52. Chwalba A., Otto-Buczkowska E.: Participation of the microbiome in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Clinical Diabetology, 6, 178–181 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  53. Chwalba A., Otto-Buczkowska E.: Udział flory jelitowej w patogenezie cukrzycy. Varia Medica, 2, 1–5 (2018)
    [CROSSREF]
  54. Clemente-Postigo M., Queipo-Ortuño M.I., Murri M., Boto-Ordoñez M., Perez-Martinez P., Andres-Lacueva C., Cardona F., Tinahones F.J.: Endotoxin increase after fat overload is related to postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in morbidly obese patients. J. Lipid. Res. 53, 973–978 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  55. Creely S.J., McTernan P.G., Kusminski C.M., Fisher f M., Da Silva N.F., Khanolkar M., Evans M., Harte A.L., Kumar S.: Lipopolysaccharide activates an innate immune system response in human adipose tissue in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab. 292, E740–747 (2007)
    [CROSSREF]
  56. Eckburg P.B., Bik E.M., Bernstein C.N., Purdom E., Dethlefsen L., Sargent M., Gill S.R., Nelson K.E., Relman D.A.: Diversity of the human intestinal microbial flora. Science, 308, 1635–1638 (2005)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  57. Furet J.P., Kong L.C., Tap J., Poitou C., Basdevant A., Bouillot J.L., Mariat D., Corthier G., Doré J., Henegar C.: et al. Differential adaptation of human gut microbiota to bariatric surgery-induced weight loss: links with metabolic and low-grade inflammation markers. Diabetes, 59, 3049–3057 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  58. Gałęcka M., Bartnicka A., Basińska A.: Znaczenie mikrobioty jelitowej w kształtowaniu zdrowia człowieka–implikacje w praktyce lekarza rodzinnego. The importance of intestinal microbiota in shaping human health–implications in the practice of the family physician. Forum Medycyny Rodzinnej, 12, 50–59 (2018)
  59. Górska-Ciebiada M., Loba M., Barylski M., Ciebiada M.: Rozpoznawanie i leczenie cukrzycy–co nowego w wytycznych Polskiego Towarzystwa Diabetologicznego? The recognition and the treatment of diabetes mellitus according to new recommendations of Polish Diabetes Association. Geriatria, 10, 112–119 (2016)
  60. Karwowska Z., Majchrzak K.: wpływ błonnika na zróżnicowanie mikroflory jelitowej (mikrobiota jelit). Bromat. Chem. Toksykol.–XLVIII, 4, 701–709 (2015)
  61. Krakowiak O., Nowak R.: Mikroflora przewodu pokarmowego człowieka–znaczenie, rozwój, modyfikacje. Post. Fitoter. 3, 193–200 (2015)
  62. Larsen N., Vogensen F.K., van den Berg F.W., Nielsen D.S., Andreasen A.S., Pedersen B.K., Al-Soud W.A., Sørensen S.J., Hansen L.H., Jakobsen M.: Gut microbiota in human adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adults. PLoS. One, 5, e9085 (2010)
  63. Majewska K., Smolarek I., Jabłecka A.: Mikroflora przewodu pokarmowego i jej rola w patogenezie cukrzycy typu 2. Farmacja Współczesna, 10, 158–162 (2017)
  64. Malinowska M., Tokarz-Deptula B., Deptula W.: Mikrobiom człowieka. Postep. Mikrobiol. 56, (2017)
  65. Marlicz W., Łoniewski I.: Mikroflora jelitowa a otyłość i rak jelita grubego. Gastroenterologia Kliniczna. Postępy i Standardy, 4, 69–78 (2012)
  66. Marlicz W., Ostrowska L., Łoniewski I.: Flora bakteryjna jelit i jej potencjalny związek z otyłością. Endokrynologia, Otyłość i Zaburzenia Przemiany Materii, 9, 20–28 (2013)
  67. Mroczyńska M., Libudzisz Z., Gałęcka M., Szachta P.: Mikroorganizmy jelitowe człowieka i ich aktywność metaboliczna. Prz. Gastroenterol. 6, (2011)
  68. Muñoz-Garach A., Diaz-Perdigones C., Tinahones F.J.: Gut microbiota and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Endocrinol. Nutr. 63, 560–568 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  69. NFZ: NFZ o zdrowiu. Cukrzyca. Narodowy Fundusz Zdrowia, (2019)
  70. Nowak A., Libudzisz Z.: Mikroorganizmy jelitowe człowieka. Standardy Medyczne–Pediatria, 5, 372–379 (2008)
  71. Ortega M.A., Fraile-Martínez O., Naya I., García-Honduvilla N., Álvarez-Mon M., Buján J., Asúnsolo Á., de la Torre B.: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Associated with Obesity (Diabesity). The Central Role of Gut Microbiota and Its Translational Applications. Nutrients, 12, 2749 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  72. Ostrowska L., Smarkusz J.: Modyfikacja mikroflory jelitowej sposobem zapobiegania lub leczenia otyłości i schorzeń metabolicznych? Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych, 7, 53–61 (2016)
  73. Palau-Rodriguez M., Tulipani S., Isabel Queipo-Ortuño M., Urpi-Sarda M., Tinahones F.J., Andres-Lacueva C.: Metabolomic insights into the intricate gut microbial-host interaction in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Front. Microbiol. 6, 1151–1151 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  74. Pellegrini S., Sordi V., Bolla A.M., Saita D., Ferrarese R., Canducci F., Clementi M., Invernizzi F., Mariani A., Bonfanti R.: et al. Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Shows Distinctive Inflammatory Profile and Microbiota. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 102, 1468–1477 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  75. Peng J., Narasimhan S., Marchesi J.R., Benson A., Wong F.S., Wen L.: Long term effect of gut microbiota transfer on diabetes development. J. Autoimmun. 53, 85–94 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  76. Pitocco D., Di Leo M., Tartaglione L., De Leva F., Petruzziello C., Saviano A., Pontecorvi A., Ojetti V.: The role of gut microbiota in mediating obesity and diabetes mellitus. Eur. Rev. Med. Pharmacol. Sci. 24, 1548–1562 (2020)
    [PUBMED]
  77. Pokrzywnicka P., Gumprecht J.: Mikrobiota i jej związek z cukrzycą typu 2 i otyłością. Diabetologia Praktyczna, 2, 190–199 (2016)
  78. Qin J., Li Y., Cai Z., Shenghui L., Zhu J., Zhang F., Liang S., Zhang W., Guan Y., Shen D.: et al. A metagenome-wide association study of gut microbiota in type 2 diabetes. Nature, 490, 55–60 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  79. Rychter A., Skoracka K., Skrypnik D.: Wpływ diety zachodniej na przepuszczalność bariery jelitowej. In: Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych, 88–97 (2019)
  80. Shi H., Kokoeva M.V., Inouye K., Tzameli I., Yin H., Flier J.S.: TLR4 links innate immunity and fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. J. Clin. Invest. 116, 3015–3025 (2006)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  81. Skonieczna-Żydecka K., Loniewski I., Maciejewska D., Marlicz W.: Intestinal microbiota and nutrients as determinants of nervous system function. Part I. Gastrointestinal microbiota. Aktualności Neurologiczne, 17, 181–188 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  82. Sun L., Yu Z., Ye X., Zou S., Li H., Yu D., Wu H., Chen Y., Dore J., Clément K.: et al. A marker of endotoxemia is associated with obesity and related metabolic disorders in apparently healthy Chinese. Diabetes Care, 33, 1925–1932 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  83. Tilg H., Moschen A.R.: Microbiota and diabetes: an evolving relationship. Gut, 63, 1513–1521 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  84. Velasquez-Manoff M.: Gut microbiome: the peacekeepers. Nature, 518, S3–11 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  85. Vrieze A., Van Nood E., Holleman F., Salojärvi J., Kootte R.S., Bartelsman J.F., Dallinga-Thie G.M., Ackermans M.T., Serlie M.J., Oozeer R.: et al. Transfer of intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Gastroenterology, 143, 913–916.e917 (2012)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  86. Wen L., Ley R.E., Volchkov P.Y., Stranges P.B., Avanesyan L., Stonebraker A.C., Hu C., Wong F.S., Szot G.L., Bluestone J.A.: et al. Innate immunity and intestinal microbiota in the development of Type 1 diabetes. Nature, 455, 1109–1113 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  87. Włodarek D., Lange E., Głąbska D., Kozłowska L.: Dietoterapia: Wyd. Lekarskie PZWL, 2015.
  88. Wołkowicz T., Januszkiewicz A., Szych J.: Mikrobiom przewodu pokarmowego i jego dysbiozy jako istotny czynnik wpływający na kondycję zdrowotną organizmu człowieka. Med. Dośw. Mikrobiol. 66, 223–235 (2014)
    [PUBMED]
  89. Zhang X., Shen D., Fang Z., Jie Z., Qiu X., Zhang C., Chen Y., Ji L.: Human gut microbiota changes reveal the progression of glucose intolerance. PLoS One, 8, e71108 (2013)
  90. Ziarno M.: Znaczenie aktywności hydrolazy soli żółci u bakterii z rodzaju Bifidobacterium. Post. Mikrobiol. 43, 285–296 (2004)

EXTRA FILES

COMMENTS