RELIABILITY-BASED EVALUATION OF LOSS DUE TO DISTRIBUTION OF NONSTRUCTURAL COMPONENTS IN HEIGHT

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Architecture, Civil Engineering, Environment

Silesian University of Technology

Subject: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Engineering, Environmental

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VOLUME 10 , ISSUE 2 (June 2017) > List of articles

RELIABILITY-BASED EVALUATION OF LOSS DUE TO DISTRIBUTION OF NONSTRUCTURAL COMPONENTS IN HEIGHT

Leila HAJ NAJAFI / Mohsen TEHRANIZADEH / Leila HAJ NAJAFI / Mohsen TEHRANIZADEH

Keywords : Nonstructural components, Cost of damage, Incorporation of stories, Dispersion of loss, Reliability Assessment, Low-rise buildings, Office occupancy

Citation Information : Architecture, Civil Engineering, Environment. Volume 10, Issue 2, Pages 77-98, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/acee-2017-022

License : (BY-NC-ND 4.0)

Received Date : 20-August-2016 / Accepted: 20-August-2016 / Published Online: 28-August-2018

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ABSTRACT

Structural and nonstructural components incorporate simultaneously and correspondingly in modern probabilistic performance evaluation to make decision making parameters which is usually economic loss in a predefined level of probability. However, far greater investment, relatively limited seismically design information and dependence of nonstructural components’ normative quantities to some architectural, economic and social features contribute to exceeded loss amounts and uncertainties under nonstructural components in comparison to structural ones. This paper addresses the question of how to distribute nonstructural components in height of a building accounting for more reliable economic loss subjected to seismic excitation through application of fully probabilistic reliability approach. This purpose has been captured through proposing a new modified distribution of building nonstructural components in height for three typical steel moment frames and conducting comparative assessments for two alternative distributions of nonstructural components with office occupancy. Dealing with discussions, it could be concluded that more reliable economic losses could be gained and also reduced by more astutely situating building nonstructural components in height considering type of dominated demands in a specific story without requirement to any alternation in component’s type or quantity.

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