EFFECT OF METAKAOLIN DEVELOPED FROM LOCAL NATURAL MATERIAL SOORH ON WORKABILITY, COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH, ULTRASONIC PULSE VELOCITY AND DRYING SHRINKAGE OF CONCRETE

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Architecture, Civil Engineering, Environment

Silesian University of Technology

Subject: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Engineering, Environmental

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ISSN: 1899-0142

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VOLUME 10 , ISSUE 2 (June 2017) > List of articles

EFFECT OF METAKAOLIN DEVELOPED FROM LOCAL NATURAL MATERIAL SOORH ON WORKABILITY, COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH, ULTRASONIC PULSE VELOCITY AND DRYING SHRINKAGE OF CONCRETE

Abdullah SAAND / Manthar Ali KEERIO / Daddan khan BANGWAR

Keywords :  Compressive Strength, Local Metakaolin, Mechanical Properties, Soorh, UP

Citation Information : Architecture, Civil Engineering, Environment. Volume 10, Issue 2, Pages 115-122, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/acee-2017-025

License : (BY-NC-ND 4.0)

Received Date : 26-May-2016 / Accepted: 28-March-2017 / Published Online: 28-August-2018

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ABSTRACT

The utilization of pozzolanic materials like metakaolin (MK) in cement mortar and concrete is growing in construction industry all around the world to reduce the CO2 release into the atmosphere and reduce energy consumption. This study instigates the performance of concrete containing locally developed metakaolin in terms of workability, unit weight, compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity and drying shrinkage of concrete. The Portland cement (PC) is replaced by inclusion of developed local metakaolin (calcined Soorh at 800°C for 2 hours duration) with dosages range; 5% to 25% with increment of 5% (by weight of cement). The investigation revealed that concrete made with 15% replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) with locally developed metakaolin (MK) has significant influance on workability, compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements and drying shrinkage of concrete as compared to OPC concrete.

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REFERENCES

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