Severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-C+G

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 31 , ISSUE 3 (September 2015) > List of articles

Severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-C+G

Riina Jernman * / Vedran Stefanovic / Anu Korhonen / Katri Haimila / Inna Sareneva / Kati Sulin / Malla Kuosmanen / Susanna Sainio

Keywords : anti-G, anti-C, HDFN, alloimmunization, intrauterine transfusion  

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 31, Issue 3, Pages 123-127, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-080

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Published Online: 26-October-2019

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Anti-G is commonly present with anti-D and/or anti-C and can confuse serological investigations. In general, anti-G is not considered a likely cause of severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), but it is important to differentiate it from anti-D in women who should be administered anti-D immunoglobulin prophylaxis. We report one woman with three pregnancies severely affected by anti-C+G requiring intrauterine treatment and a review of the literature. In our case, the identification of the correct antibody was delayed because the differentiation of anti-C+G and anti-D+C was not considered important during pregnancy since the father was D–. In addition, anti-C+G and anti-G titer levels were not found to be as reliable as is generally considered in Rh immunization. Severe HDFN occurred at a maternal anti-C+G antibody titer of 8 and anti-G titer of 1 in comparison with the critical titer level of 16 or more in our laboratory. Close collaboration between the immunohematology laboratory and the obstetric unit is essential. In previously affected families, early assessment for fetal anemia is required even when titers are low.

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