Typing of normal and variant red cells with ABO, Rh, and Kell typing reagents using a gel typing system

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 7 , ISSUE 4 (December 1991) > List of articles

Typing of normal and variant red cells with ABO, Rh, and Kell typing reagents using a gel typing system

Don Tills / Derek J. Ward / Dieter Josef

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 7, Issue 4, Pages 94-97, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-1023

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 14-December-2020

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ABSTRACT

In 1989 Lapierre et al. described a novel method of detecting agglutination reactions by the use of a Sephadex (DiaMed ID Typing System) gel held in a microtube. This report examines the use of gels containing ABO, Rh, and Kell system specific antibodies. The anti-A and -B were monoclonal reagents; anti-A,B, and those for the Rh and Kell systems were polyclonal. Five hundred and fifty-one tests performed for the ABO system detected all but the most weakly reacting variants, a detection rate superior to most commercially available reagents. Five hundred and thirty samples were typed for Rh antigens. One hundred and twenty-seven of these were of various D category III through VII types (Dcats) and 154 were DUs. The gel system detected all but seven DVI variants and seven DUs. The seven DVI variants, from individuals with no anti-D in their sera, gave reactions identical to the seven DUs when tested against a panel of over 50 monoclonal IgG and IgM anti-Ds. The 554 samples tested for the K1 antigen gave correct results.

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