A case of masquerading alloantibodies:  the value of a multitechnique approach

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 30 , ISSUE 3 (September 2014) > List of articles

A case of masquerading alloantibodies:  the value of a multitechnique approach

Paula M.S. Wennersten / Laurie J. Sutor

Keywords : ABO discrepancy, cold autoantibodies, gel column technology, ficin, alloantibodies

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 30, Issue 3, Pages 117-120, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-105

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 01-December-2019

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ABSTRACT

In an immunohematology reference laboratory, samples received for antibody identification react in many different ways requiring a variety of approaches. Sometimes, the clues from initial testing can lead to faulty assumptions and misdirection. Fortunately, a well-supplied reference laboratory will have access to a variety of techniques and reagents that, when used together, can reveal the true identity of the antibodies involved. We present a case of a patient sample with an apparent group AB, D+ blood type showing strong reactivity with all cells tested  in the forward and reverse ABO, in the D testing as well as in a three-cell antibody screen. The initial assumption was that the plasma contained a cold autoantibody. Subsequent testing, including the use of gel column technology, ficin-treated cells, and antisera for phenotyping, showed the apparent cold autoantibody to be a red herring. Additional tube testing at immediate spin, 37°C, and indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) revealed the presence of four alloantibodies: anti-M and anti-E reacting at immediate spin, 37°C, and IAT plus anti-Fya and anti-Jkb reacting at IAT.

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