Micropool procedure for routine donor antibody detection

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 4 , ISSUE 3 (September 1988) > List of articles

Micropool procedure for routine donor antibody detection

Denzil Smith

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 4, Issue 3, Pages 53-58, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-1104

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 29-December-2020

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Microplate technology was combined with manual sample pooling techniques to determine if advantages associated with each method could be realized in a single test system. Fresh serum and plasma samples collected from routine blood donors and patient samples selected from frozen storage were screened for significant, unexpected antibodies. A total of 94 samples with known antibody specificities were selected for testing. Two micropool techniques, stream-micropool and mix-micropool, were compared to a pooled-tube method. The stream-micropool method proved superior in overall detection of the antibodies (85%) and in detection of the macroscopically reactive antibodies (96%). Special formulas were used to calculate sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of each micropool method. The sensitivity of the stream­-micropool method was 96 percent and that of the mix-micropool, 87 percent. For both methods, specificity and efficiency were  99 percent. In a separate study, there was no difference between the use of serum as opposed to plasma. Micropool methods offer a sensitive, easily mastered alternative to manual tube testing tech­niques for large batch donor antibody detection.

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