Posttransplant maternal anti-D: a case study and review

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 28 , ISSUE 2 (June 2012) > List of articles

Posttransplant maternal anti-D: a case study and review

Lisa Senzel / Cecilia Avila / Tahmeena Ahmed / Harjeet Gill / Kim Hue-Roye / Christine Lomas-Francis / Marion E. Reid

Keywords : immunohematology, stem cell transplantation, transfusion medicine

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 28, Issue 2, Pages 55-59, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-150

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 01-December-2019

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ABSTRACT

Plasma from a 35-year-old, D– woman was found to have anti-D, -C, and -G at 5 weeks’ gestation and again at 8 weeks’ gestation, when she presented with a nonviable intrauterine pregnancy. The anti-D titer increased with a pattern that suggested it was stimulated by the 8-week pregnancy. Six years before this admission, the patient’s blood type changed from group O, D+ to group O, D– after a bone marrow transplant for aplastic anemia. Three years after transplant, the antibody screen was negative. After the patient was admitted for the nonviable pregnancy, the products of con-ception were found to be D+ by DNA testing for RHD. There were no documented transfusions or pregnancies during the interval in which anti-D appeared. The timing of the alloimmunization was unusual. In a subsequent pregnancy, fetal D typing was performed by molecular methods.

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