Should blood donors be routinely screened for irregular antibodies?

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 28 , ISSUE 2 (June 2012) > List of articles

Should blood donors be routinely screened for irregular antibodies?

Michel Andrés García / Leonardo Bautista / Fernando Palomino

Keywords : blood donor, alloantibody screening, alloantibody identification, blood bank, blood recipient

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 28, Issue 2, Pages 60-66, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-151

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 01-December-2019

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Alloantibody reactivity is approximately 0.3 percent in blood donors worldwide. The present study established total alloantibody and clinically significant alloantibody (CSAA) frequencies in all Colombian Red Cross National Blood Bank donors (almost all donors were Colombian). The probability of these alloantibodies reacting with a specific antigen in the general population was also determined, focusing on male CSAA data because routine practice in this blood bank is to discard female plasma components to avoid transfusion-related acute lung syndrome. Total blood donor population between 2007 and 2009 was 60,309 (55.4% male and 44.6% female). Cells I and II were used for alloantibody screening following the Autovue protocol. Positive samples were identified by red blood cell (RBC) panels (Panel A, Panel B, and Panel C, Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Raritan, NJ). Alloantibody and CSAA frequency were established for both sexes. The database for RBC antigens estimated for the Colombian population was used for calculating the probability of antigen-antibody reaction from donors in this blood bank. Total alloantibodies (438) and CSAA frequency (138) were significantly higher in women than men (p < 0.01). Seventy-four percent of CSAA found in women came from the Rh blood group system. Calculated probability of generating antigen-antibody reaction using plasma only from male donors was estimated as 20.55 episodes for every 100,000 donations, and the probable number of events per year was 1.48. Meanwhile, considering all blood components from male and female origin, the calculated probability of antigen-antibody reaction was 123.54 episodes for every 100,000 donations and 28.67 probable events per year. The data presented here do not represent strong support for the routine screening of alloantibodies in blood donors.

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