Seroprevalence of unexpected red blood cell antibodies among pregnant women in Uganda

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 28 , ISSUE 4 (December 2012) > List of articles

Seroprevalence of unexpected red blood cell antibodies among pregnant women in Uganda

Kristina Eipl / Clemensia Nakabiito / Kabali Bwogi / Mahnaz Motevalli / Angela Roots / Lorraine Blagg / J. Brooks Jackson

Keywords : pregnant women, red blood cell antibodies, Uganda

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 28, Issue 4, Pages 115-117, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-160

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 01-December-2019

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study among pregnant women in Kampala, Uganda, to determine ABO and D blood types and to determine the percentage who have unexpected red blood cell (RBC) antibodies and their specificities. Deidentified blood samples from routine testing of 1001 pregnant women at the Mulago Hospital antenatal clinics in Kampala were typed for ABO and D and screened for the presence of unexpected RBC antibodies with confirmation and subsequent antibody identification. Of the 1001 blood samples tested, 48.9 percent, 26.4 percent, 21.0 percent, and 3.8 percent tested positive for blood groups O, A, B, and AB, respectively. Of these samples, 23 (2.3%) were negative for D, and 55 (5.5%) showed initial reactivity with at least one screening RBC. The RBC antibody screen was repeated on these 55 samples, and antibody identification was performed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Blood Bank in Baltimore, Maryland. Twenty-one of the 55 samples were confirmed to have evidence of agglutination. Nine of the 21 samples demonstrated the presence of clinically significant RBC antibodies with anti-S being the most common, 8 samples demonstrated the presence of benign or naturally occurring antibodies, and 4 had only inconclusive reactivity. This study revealed a relatively high frequency of D and a low frequency of demonstrable clinically significant alloantibodies that may cause hemolytic disease of the newborn or hemolytic transfusion reactions among pregnant women in Kampala, with anti-S being the most frequent antibody specificity.

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