The Dombrock blood group system: a review

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 26 , ISSUE 2 (June 2010) > List of articles

The Dombrock blood group system: a review

Christine Lomas-Francis / Marion E. Reid

Keywords : ART, blood group system, Dombrock blood group system, monoADP-ribosyltransferase, ADP-ribosyltransferase

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 26, Issue 2, Pages 71-78, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-206

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 12-March-2020

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

The Dombrock blood group system (Do) consists of two antithetical antigens (Doa and Dob) and five antigens of high prevalence (Gya, Hy, Joa, DOYA, and DOMR). Do antigens are carried on the Dombrock glycoprotein, which is attached to the RBC membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol linkage. The gene (DO, ART4) encoding the Do glycoprotein, located on the short arm of chromosome 12, has been cloned and sequenced, allowing the molecular basis of the various Do phenotypes to be determined. Doa and Dob have a prevalence that makes them useful as genetic markers; however, the paucity of reliable anti-Doa and anti-Dob has prevented this potential from being realized. The ease with which these antigens can be predicted by analysis of DNA opens the door for such studies to be carried out. Anti-Doa and anti-Dob are rarely found as a single specificity, but they have been implicated in causing hemolytic transfusion reactions. This review is a synthesis of our current knowledge of the Dombrock blood group system.

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