Detection and identification of platelet antibodies and antigens in the clinical laboratory

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 25 , ISSUE 3 (September 2009) > List of articles

Detection and identification of platelet antibodies and antigens in the clinical laboratory

Brian R. Curtis / Janice G. McFarland

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 25, Issue 3, Pages 125-135, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-245

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 20-March-2020

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ABSTRACT

As a result of the unique functional properties of platelets, morerobust methods were required for detection of antibodies raised against them. Immunofluorescence detection by flow cytometry, solid-phase red cell adherence, and antigen capture ELISAs are some of the current tests that have been developed to meet the challenges of platelet antibody detection and identification and antigen phenotyping. Recently developed protein liquid bead arrays are becoming the next-generation platelet antibody tests. Fueled by development of PCR and determination of the molecular basis of the PlA1 human platelet antigen (HPA), serologic platelet typing has now been replaced by genotyping of DNA. Allele-specific PCR, melting curve analysis, and 5′-nuclease assays are now evolving into more high-throughput molecular tests. Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of immune platelet disorders has advanced considerably from its humble beginnings.

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