A gel technology system to determine postpartum RhIG dosage

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 16 , ISSUE 3 (September 2000) > List of articles

A gel technology system to determine postpartum RhIG dosage

John R. Fernandes / Ronny Chan / Ahmed S. Coovadia / Marciano D. Reis / Peter H. Pinkerton

Keywords : fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH), gel technology, Kleihauer–Betke (K–B)

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 16, Issue 3, Pages 115-119, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-590

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 18-October-2020

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Failures of Rh immune globulin (RhIG) prophylaxis occur when the dose is too small. We report a test using a gel technology (GT) method to replace the Kleihauer–Betke (K–B) test to assess fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) and assist in determining the minimum necessary dose of RhIG. Cord blood (O, D+) was mixed with adult blood (O D–) to mimic an FMH of 10 mL, 20 mL, 28 mL, and 40 mL. Test samples were incubated with anti-D at known concentrations and centrifuged. The supernatant was titrated against D+ and D– red cells using GT and an interpretation of the required RhIG dose was made. Results were compared with the K–B test. Results were easily discernible and interpretations leading to determination of recommended RhIG dosage were reproducible. Correlation to standard K–B testing was confirmed. Elapsed time for result availability by GT testing was 60 minutes, with a direct technical time requirement of 30 minutes. The GT system is easier, objective, and quantitative, and compares well to the standard K–B test. A single procedure will allow assessment of the extent of FMH in the great majority of cases. This technique works well in determining the appropriate dose of anti-D required to treat D– patients with D+ newborns. There are potential cost savings in decreased use of RhIG, less direct technical time required, and more rapid availability of results.

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