DNA from urine sediment or buccal cells can be used for blood group molecular genotyping

Publications

Share / Export Citation / Email / Print / Text size:

Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

GET ALERTS SUBSCRIBE

ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

DESCRIPTION

4
Reader(s)
4
Visit(s)
0
Comment(s)
0
Share(s)

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue / page

Archive
Volume 37 (2021)
Volume 36 (2020)
Volume 35 (2019)
Volume 34 (2018)
Volume 33 (2017)
Volume 32 (2016)
Volume 31 (2015)
Volume 30 (2014)
Volume 29 (2013)
Volume 28 (2012)
Volume 27 (2011)
Volume 26 (2010)
Volume 25 (2009)
Volume 24 (2008)
Volume 23 (2007)
Volume 22 (2006)
Volume 21 (2005)
Volume 20 (2004)
Volume 19 (2003)
Volume 18 (2002)
Volume 17 (2001)
Volume 16 (2000)
Volume 15 (1999)
Volume 14 (1998)
Volume 13 (1997)
Volume 12 (1996)
Volume 11 (1995)
Volume 10 (1994)
Volume 9 (1993)
Volume 8 (1992)
Volume 7 (1991)
Volume 6 (1990)
Volume 5 (1989)
Volume 4 (1988)
Volume 3 (1987)
Related articles

VOLUME 15 , ISSUE 2 (June 1999) > List of articles

DNA from urine sediment or buccal cells can be used for blood group molecular genotyping

Marion E. Reid / Maria J. Rios / Kevin L. Cash / Annie M. Strupp / Joan M. Uehlinger

Keywords : blood group genotyping, buccal cells— DNA, DNA preparation, urine—DNA

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 15, Issue 2, Pages 61-65, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-614

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 26-October-2020

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Accurate blood group antigen typing of red blood cells with a positive direct antiglobulin test or from a recently transfused patient has been a long-standing problem. To overcome this problem, we evaluated the feasibility of using somatic cells as a source of DNA for molecular genotyping. Two sources of cells that could be obtained by noninvasive procedures were chosen for analysis: urine samples, which were already available in the clinical laboratory, and buccal epithelial cells collected with cotton wool swabs. DNA, prepared using a commercial kit, was subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification and followed by digestion with the appropriate restriction enzyme. Genotyping was performed for three alleles encoded by polymorphic genes on three different chromosomes, namely KEL1/KEL2, JKA/JKB, and FYA/FYB. Genotyping results were compared to the results of typing performed on red blood cells using standard hemagglutination techniques. Results given by samples freshly collected from volunteer donors were concordant. Although results obtained with samples collected from hospital patients were initially not in agreement with the phenotyping results, adjustments to the test protocol resulted in concordance. DNA from blood, urine sediment, or buccal cells can be used for blood group molecular genotyping.

You don't have 'Full Text' access of this article.

Purchase Article Subscribe Journal Share