Precipitation of serum proteins by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in  pretransfusion testing

Publications

Share / Export Citation / Email / Print / Text size:

Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

GET ALERTS SUBSCRIBE

ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

DESCRIPTION

6
Reader(s)
7
Visit(s)
0
Comment(s)
0
Share(s)

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue / page

Archive
Volume 37 (2021)
Volume 36 (2020)
Volume 35 (2019)
Volume 34 (2018)
Volume 33 (2017)
Volume 32 (2016)
Volume 31 (2015)
Volume 30 (2014)
Volume 29 (2013)
Volume 28 (2012)
Volume 27 (2011)
Volume 26 (2010)
Volume 25 (2009)
Volume 24 (2008)
Volume 23 (2007)
Volume 22 (2006)
Volume 21 (2005)
Volume 20 (2004)
Volume 19 (2003)
Volume 18 (2002)
Volume 17 (2001)
Volume 16 (2000)
Volume 15 (1999)
Volume 14 (1998)
Volume 13 (1997)
Volume 12 (1996)
Volume 11 (1995)
Volume 10 (1994)
Volume 9 (1993)
Volume 8 (1992)
Volume 7 (1991)
Volume 6 (1990)
Volume 5 (1989)
Volume 4 (1988)
Volume 3 (1987)
Related articles

VOLUME 15 , ISSUE 3 (September 1999) > List of articles

Precipitation of serum proteins by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in  pretransfusion testing

Jack Hoffer / William P. Koslosky / Elizabeth S. Gloster / Therese M. Dimaio / Marion E. Reid

Keywords : polyethylene glycol, hypergammaglobinemia, false positive, antibody screen

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 15, Issue 3, Pages 105-107, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-627

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 26-October-2020

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is used as a potentiator of blood group antigen-antibody interactions. Although PEG is known to precipitate immunoglobulins, we could find no reports of this reagent entrapping red blood cells (RBCs) in irreversible clumps. The patient we describe here had hyperglobulinemia with a reversed albumin: globulin ratio and a diffuse immunoglobulin peak on serum protein electrophoresis. During preparation of serologic tests, a precipitate formed that entrapped the RBCs when PEG was added. Rapid recognition of this phenomenon could prevent delay in the selection of blood for transfusion by substituting PEG-indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) with another technique such as low-ionic-strength solution and by increasing the number of washes prior to addition of the antiglobulin reagent.

You don't have 'Full Text' access of this article.

Purchase Article Subscribe Journal Share