GIL: a red cell antigen of very high frequency

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 14 , ISSUE 2 (June 1998) > List of articles

GIL: a red cell antigen of very high frequency

Geoff Daniels / E. Nicole DeLong / Virginia Hare / Susan T. Johnson / Pierre-Yves LePennec / Delores Mallory / M. Jane Marshall / Cindy Oliver / Peggy Spruell

Keywords : blood groups, high-frequency antigens, red cells, GIL

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 14, Issue 2, Pages 49-52, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-659

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 03-November-2020

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ABSTRACT

A new high-frequency red cell antigen has been identified and named GIL. GIL differs from all high-frequency antigens included in the International Society of Blood Transfusion classification. There is very little family information and GIL has not been shown to be an inherited character. Five women with anti-GIL have been found. All had been pregnant at least twice. Red blood cells of two of the babies gave positive direct antiglobulin tests, but there were no clinical signs of hemolytic disease. Anti-GIL may have been responsible for a hemolytic transfusion reaction and results of monocyte monolayer assays of two of the anti-GIL suggested a potential to cause destruction of transfused GIL+ RBCs.

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