A maternal warm-reactive autoantibody presenting as a positive direct antiglobulin test in a neonate

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 13 , ISSUE 1 (March 1997) > List of articles

A maternal warm-reactive autoantibody presenting as a positive direct antiglobulin test in a neonate

Terry D. Williamson / Linda H. Liles / Douglas P. Blackall

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 13, Issue 1, Pages 6-8, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-691

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Published Online: 09-November-2020

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ABSTRACT

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in pregnancy is a rare cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn. This report describes a neonate with a mild hemolytic process and a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) presenting as the first manifestations of a maternal warm-reactive autoantibody. A full-term male neonate, blood group O, had a strongly positive DAT and laboratory evidence suggestive of a mild hemolytic process. The neonate’s mother was also group O and had a negative antibody screen. Umbilical cord blood testing revealed a panreactive eluate though the antibody was not detected in cord serum. The neonate’s mother was also found to have a positive DAT. A panagglutinin was identified in an eluate of her red cells, although the autoantibody could not be detected in her serum by a variety of sensitive techniques. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence of maternal hemolysis.

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