Absence of hemolysis after a kidney transplant in an E+ recipient from a donor with anti-E

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 13 , ISSUE 4 (December 1997) > List of articles

Absence of hemolysis after a kidney transplant in an E+ recipient from a donor with anti-E

Marcia C. Zago-Novaretti / Carlos Roberto Jorge / Eduardo Jens / Pedro Enrique Dorihiac-Llacer / Dalton de Alencar Fischer Chamone

Keywords : renal transplantation, alloimmunization, transplantation

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 13, Issue 4, Pages 138-140, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-730

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 09-November-2020

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

A 12-year-old Caucasian male with cystinosis received a kidney from his mother, whose red blood cells typed as group O, D+, E–. Her serum contained an anti-E with an IgG1 titer of 16 (score 31). The recipient’s type was group O, D+, E+, with a negative antibody screen in the pretransplant period. The recipient and donor Rh phenotypes were most likely DCcEe and Dccee, respectively. Because the recipient’s mother had no transfusion history, she was probably immunized by the fetal red blood cells of her one pregnancy (the recipient). The kidney had been immediately perfused with saline after removal from the donor. No acute or delayed hemolysis was observed clinically or in laboratory tests performed immediately after the transplant and at 7, 15, and 30 days after the transplant. Antibody screens were still negative at 6 months. In this case, anti-E was not present in the transplanted kidney in sufficient concentration to cause hemolysis of the recipient’s red blood cells and transplanted lymphocytes did not synthesize sufficient anti-E to be detectable or to cause hemolysis.

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