En(a-) phenotype in a Japanese blood donor

Publications

Share / Export Citation / Email / Print / Text size:

Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

GET ALERTS SUBSCRIBE

ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

DESCRIPTION

6
Reader(s)
13
Visit(s)
0
Comment(s)
0
Share(s)

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue / page

Archive
Volume 37 (2021)
Volume 36 (2020)
Volume 35 (2019)
Volume 34 (2018)
Volume 33 (2017)
Volume 32 (2016)
Volume 31 (2015)
Volume 30 (2014)
Volume 29 (2013)
Volume 28 (2012)
Volume 27 (2011)
Volume 26 (2010)
Volume 25 (2009)
Volume 24 (2008)
Volume 23 (2007)
Volume 22 (2006)
Volume 21 (2005)
Volume 20 (2004)
Volume 19 (2003)
Volume 18 (2002)
Volume 17 (2001)
Volume 16 (2000)
Volume 15 (1999)
Volume 14 (1998)
Volume 13 (1997)
Volume 12 (1996)
Volume 11 (1995)
Volume 10 (1994)
Volume 9 (1993)
Volume 8 (1992)
Volume 7 (1991)
Volume 6 (1990)
Volume 5 (1989)
Volume 4 (1988)
Volume 3 (1987)
Related articles

VOLUME 9 , ISSUE 4 (December 1993) > List of articles

En(a-) phenotype in a Japanese blood donor

Yasuto Okubo / Taiko Seno / Hideo Yamaguchi / Yoshihisa Miyata / Carole A. Green / Geoffrey L. Daniels

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 9, Issue 4, Pages 105-108, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-969

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 06-December-2020

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

The first Japanese En(a-) individual (T.N.) was found by screening red cells from 250,000 Japanese blood donors with monoclonal anti-Ena. His serum contained no atypical antibodies and his partial red cell phenotype was M-N-S+s-, although a trypsin-resistant N antigen was detected. His red cells were En(a-) and Wr(b-), as determined by various human and mouse monoclonal antibodies. The absence of glycophorin A (GPA) and the presence of apparently normal glycophorin B (GPB) were demonstrated by immunoblotting with antibodies to the extracellular and cytoplasmic domain of GPA and to epitopes common to GPA and GPB. Sialic acid levels of T.N.'s intact red cells were substantially lower than those of control MN cells. Serologic tests suggested that both of T.N.'s parents were heterozygous for a recessive GPA deficiency gene.

You don't have 'Full Text' access of this article.

Purchase Article Subscribe Journal Share