Clinical approach after identification of a rare anti-Ena in a prenatal sample

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 35 , ISSUE 4 (December 2019) > List of articles

Clinical approach after identification of a rare anti-Ena in a prenatal sample

P.J. Howard * / L. Guerra / D.K. Kuttner / M.R. George

Keywords : Ena, antibody, prenatal, MNS

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 35, Issue 4, Pages 159-161, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2020-033

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 16-February-2021

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

The antigens associated with the MNS blood group system (ISBT 002) are located on glycophorin A (GPA) and glycophorin B (GPB). The most frequently encountered antibodies to antigens in this system by a transfusion medicine service are those directed against M, N, S, and s. Individuals lacking GPA typically have red blood cells that lack M, N, and Ena, whereas those lacking both GPA and GPB lack M, N, and Ena as well as S, s, and U. Such individuals may develop a rare antibody, anti-Ena, directed against determinants on GPA. This antibody is capable of causing hemolytic transfusion reactions and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. This case report describes a pregnant woman found to have anti-Ena. Molecular testing supported an Mk phenotype that was found in several members of her immediate family.

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