Blood component administration to multiple myeloma patients treated with daratumumab: suggesting a novel approach with use of 0.1 M dithiothreitol

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 36 , ISSUE 4 (December 2020) > List of articles

Blood component administration to multiple myeloma patients treated with daratumumab: suggesting a novel approach with use of 0.1 M dithiothreitol

P. Pandey / D. Setya * / E. Kaul / S. Ranjan / M.K. Singh / A. Shankar

Keywords : DARA, daratumumab, CD38, DTT, multiple myeloma, hemolysis

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 36, Issue 4, Pages 157-165, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2020-056

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Published Online: 17-February-2021

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ABSTRACT

Storage of dithiothreitol (DTT)-treated red blood cells (RBCs) leads to hemolysis. The aim of this study was to compare 0.1 M DTT with 0.2 M DTT treatment of RBCs and to share our experience of providing components to seven patients on daratumumab (DARA). This prospective, observational study included patients who required RBC transfusion within 6 months of DARA administration. All patients underwent a baseline serologic evaluation followed by a repeat evaluation after DARA administration. In addition, use of 0.1 M DTT was compared with 0.2 M DTT in terms of concordance of results, hemolysis with storage of treated RBCs, and ease of use. A total of 22 RBC requisitions were received for seven patients. Antibody screen was positive for one patient (anti-C) at baseline; it was panreactive for all patients after DARA. Concordance of results between the two concentrations was 98.5 percent. Laboratory personnel found results obtained with use of 0.1 M DTT–treated RBCs easy to interpret. Supernatant hemoglobin was found to be significantly greater for 0.2 M DTT–treated RBCs at the sixth day of storage. In conclusion, component administration to patients on DARA can be done without delay if adequate policies and procedures are in place. Use of 0.1 M DTT–pretreated RBCs can be used to avoid delay in transfusion and reduce the burden on the laboratory of weekly preparation of 0.2 M DTT–treated RBCs.

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