B subgroup detection in a small hospital transfusion service

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 37 , ISSUE 2 (Jun 2021) > List of articles

B subgroup detection in a small hospital transfusion service

E. Elardo * / N. Elbadri / C. Sanchez / V. Powell / M. Smaris / Y. Li / J. Jacobson / T. Hilbert / T. Hamilton / D.W. Wu

Keywords : blood group discrepancy, ABO blood group, B subgroup, transfusion reaction, ABO mismatch

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 37, Issue 2, Pages 89-94, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2021-014

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 25-June-2021

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ABSTRACT

The ABO blood group system includes phenotypes, or subgroups, that differ in the amount of A and B antigens present on the red blood cells (RBCs). These subgroups also differ in the A, B, or H substances present in secretions (for individuals who have the secretor phenotype). B subgroups are very rare and are less frequently reported than A subgroups. Usually, B subgroups are discovered during serologic testing when there is a discrepancy between RBC and serum grouping results. Subgroups of B are usually identified by a reference laboratory using molecular and adsorption-elution methods. This report details a case of a young, healthy, pregnant woman with a B subgroup detected by a small transfusion service using adsorption-elution methods. Serology and genotyping of the ABO gene was performed at a reference laboratory where the serology was consistent with a B subgroup, but no changes were identified in ABO gene sequencing. It is important to correctly identify B subgroups in donors and recipients to help resolve ABO discrepancies and potentially prevent ABO incompatibility in blood transfusion, thus minimizing transfusion reactions.

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