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Article | 21-April-2020

Novel molecular basis of an Inab phenotype  

daughter was also studied. Sequence analysis revealed a substitution of 508C>T in exon 4 of DAF in the proband. The proband’s daughter was heterozygous for 508C/T. This study describes an Inab phenotype in which the 508C>T nonsense mutation is predicted to change arginine at amino acid residue 136 to a stop codon. This change is in SCR 3 of DAF . This study reports on the molecular basis of a new proband with the Inab phenotype who had no history of intestinal disorders.

Kim Hue-Roye, Vivien E. Powell, Gita Patel, Debra Lane, Mariska Maguire, Amy Chung, Marion E. Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 21 , ISSUE 2, 53–55

Review | 14-March-2020

The Cromer blood group system: a review

protein. The RBCs of people with the Cromer null phenotype, Inab, lack DAF but do not appear to demonstrate increased susceptibility to hemolysis. Antibodies to Cromer antigens are rarely encountered, although there is evidence that the antibodies may cause accelerated destruction of transfused RBCs. There is no risk of HDN associated with Cromer system antibodies because the placenta is a rich source of fetally derived DAF, which is thought to adsorb the antibodies.

Jill R. Storry, Marion E. Reid, Mark H. Yazer

Immunohematology, Volume 26 , ISSUE 3, 109–117

Article | 20-December-2020

Cromer-related blood group antigens and the glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-linked protein, decay-accelerating factor DAF (CD55)

Cromer-related blood group antigens are located on the complement regulatory glycoprotein, decay-accelerating factor (DAF). DAF is not detectable on red cells from individuals with a Cromernull phenotype (termed Inab), which is probably an inherited condition. DAF is also absent from a subpopulation of red cells (PNH III) from patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), an acquired hematological defect. PNH III red cells, like Inab cells, lack all the Cromer-related antigens

Marion Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 6 , ISSUE 2, 27–29

Review | 14-October-2020

The Cromer blood group system: a review

DAF protein. The red blood cells (RBCs) of people with the Cromer null phenotype, Inab, lack DAF. Antibodies to Cromer antigens are rarely encountered although there is evidence that the antibodies may cause accelerated destruction of transfused RBCs. There is no risk of hemolytic disease of the newborn associated with Cromer system antibodies because the placenta is a rich source of fetally derived DAF, which is thought to adsorb the antibodies.

Jill R. Storry, Marion E. Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 18 , ISSUE 4, 95–103

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