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  • Immunohematology

 

Case report | 16-March-2020

Autoantibody formation after alloimmunization inducing bystander immune hemolysis

The development of RBC autoantibodies resulting from or associated with allogeneic blood transfusions is not an easily determined complication of RBC transfusions. This report discusses one patient who developed RBC autoantibodies in association with an allogeneic blood transfusion and alloimmunization leading to a temporary bystander immune hemolysis. A 72-year-old woman was hospitalized as a result of severe anemia and received two units of ABO- and D-compatible RBCs. She had a history of two

Mariza Mota, C. Bley, M.G. Aravechia, N. Hamerschlak, A. Sakashita, J.M. Kutner, L. Castilho

Immunohematology, Volume 25 , ISSUE 1, 9–12

Review | 28-April-2020

Review: complement receptor 1 therapeutics for prevention of immune hemolysis

Karina Yazdanbakhsh

Immunohematology, Volume 21 , ISSUE 3, 109–118

Review | 16-May-2020

Review: evaluation of patients with immune hemolysis

Lawrence D. Petz

Immunohematology, Volume 20 , ISSUE 3, 167–176

Case report | 06-December-2020

Immune-mediated hemolysis in a postoperative patient Case report: anti-U and differential diagnosis

We present the differential diagnosis for a Coombs-positive immune hemolysis having onset during hospitalization and, in particular, during the postoperative period. The stimulus for this article was a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) due to anti-U following open-heart surgery. The initial clinical and serologic findings led us to consider other causes of immune hemolysis which are reviewed in this article. To our knowledge, this is the fourth case of a DHTR due to anti-U to be

Gnanasagren Sathaseevan Pillay, Betty Womack, S. Gerald Sandler

Immunohematology, Volume 9 , ISSUE 2, 41–46

Report | 26-October-2019

Clinical and reference lab characteristics of patients with suspected direct antiglobulin test (DAT)-negative immune hemolytic anemia

Clinical evidence of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia is present in 1 percent to 10 percent of patients whose direct antiglobulin test (DAT) is negative. The clinical underpinnings associated with DAT-negative immune hemolysis are poorly understood, and the current study aimed to further define the clinical characteristics associated with this form of anemia. A 19-question survey, requesting clinical information about each patient, was retrospectively mailed to all referring labs that had sent

Matthew S. Karafin, Gregory A. Denomme, Michael Schanen, Jerome L. Gottschall

Immunohematology, Volume 31 , ISSUE 3, 108–115

Article | 18-October-2020

Quantitation of red cell-bound immunoglobulins and complement in lymphoma patients

peripheral T-cell lymphoma), as well as in Hodgkin’s disease, autoimmune hemolysis contributes little, if any, anemia. The quantitative ELISA for RBC-associated IgG and complement is useful for following the effects of treatment in patients with immune hemolysis.

M. Podberezin, A. Levina, L. Romanova, O. Margolin, O. Nasibov, A.V. Pivnik

Immunohematology, Volume 16 , ISSUE 4, 147–153

Letter to Editor | 06-December-2020

Letter to the Editor: A fatal case of tolmetin-induced immune hemolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and acute renal failure

Valerie Jackson, Aaron M. Josephson, Jill Storry, Debra Futral, Floyd T. Boudreau

Immunohematology, Volume 8 , ISSUE 3, 79–79

Case report | 06-November-2019

Diagnostic pitfalls of drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

Abdulgabar Salama, Beate Mayer

Immunohematology, Volume 30 , ISSUE 2, 80–84

Report | 06-November-2019

How we investigate drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

Drugs are a rare cause of immune hemolytic anemia, but an investigation for a drug antibody may be warranted if a patient has definitive evidence of immune hemolysis, other more common causes of hemolysis have been excluded, and there is a good temporal relationship between the administration of a drug and the hemolytic event. Drug antibodies are either drug-dependent (require drug to be in the test system) or drug-independent (reactive without drug present in the test). Drug-dependent

Regina M. Leger, Patricia A. Arndt, George Garratty

Immunohematology, Volume 30 , ISSUE 2, 85–94

Article | 09-November-2020

Immune hemolytic anemia due to diclofenac

A 37-year-old male presented with severe anemia, mild jaundice, and hemoglobinuria during his second course of diclofenac for gout. The peripheral blood showed microspherocytes and nucleated red blood cells (RBCs). The reticulocyte count was 21 percent and haptoglobin was < 0.1 g/L. A presumptive diagnosis of diclofenac-induced immune hemolysis was made and blood, urine, and drug samples were referred for investigation. Direct antiglobulin testing showed the RBCs to be coated with IgG1, IgG4

S.T. Laidlaw, R. Stamps, D.J. Booker, M.J. Brown, R.J. Sokol

Immunohematology, Volume 13 , ISSUE 1, 9–11

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