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  • Immunohematology

 

Article | 09-October-2019

Applications of selected cells in immunohematology in a developing country: case studies

Ravi C. Dara Dara, Aseem Kumar Tiwari, Dinesh Arora, Subhasis Mitra, Geet Aggarwal, Devi Prasad Acharya, Gunjan Bhardwaj

Immunohematology, Volume 33 , ISSUE 1, 27–35

Original Paper | 09-October-2019

A field analysis trial comparing the turnaround times of routine and STAT red blood cell immunohematology testing

Katie Sackett, Andrea Kjell, Abigail M. Schneider Schneider, Claudia S. Cohn Cohn

Immunohematology, Volume 33 , ISSUE 1, 1–5

Article | 10-April-2021

The Ok blood group system: an update

J.R. Storry

Immunohematology, Volume 37 , ISSUE 1, 18–19

Correction | 22-November-2020

CORRECTIONS: Immunohematology Methods and Procedure

Immunohematology, Volume 10 , ISSUE 2, 67–68

Book Review | 29-December-2020

BOOK REVIEW: Methods in Immunohematology

Ruth Mougey

Immunohematology, Volume 4 , ISSUE 4, 87–87

Case report | 01-December-2019

Posttransplant maternal anti-D: a case study and review

Lisa Senzel, Cecilia Avila, Tahmeena Ahmed, Harjeet Gill, Kim Hue-Roye, Christine Lomas-Francis, Marion E. Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 28 , ISSUE 2, 55–59

Book Review | 30-November-2020

BOOK REVIEW: Immunohematology Methods and Procedures

Jane L. Swanson

Immunohematology, Volume 10 , ISSUE 4, 139–139

Article | 26-October-2019

HEA BeadChipTM technology in immunohematology

Cinzia Paccapelo, Francesca Truglio, Maria Antonietta Villa, Nicoletta Revelli, Maurizio Marconi

Immunohematology, Volume 31 , ISSUE 2, 81–90

Review | 16-March-2020

Milestones in Immunohematology 1984–2009

Delores Mallory

Immunohematology, Volume 25 , ISSUE 1, 2–4

Article | 17-February-2021

May the FORS be with you: a system sequel

A.K. Hult, M.L. Olsson

Immunohematology, Volume 36 , ISSUE 1, 14–18

Article | 27-December-2020

Selection of tests and services to generate revenue for reference laboratories

The 1980s have brought heightened awareness of the operating costs of immunohematology reference laboratories. Revenues can be increased by raising existing charges, expanding services, and acquiring new customers. Selection of tests and services to further increase revenue is best made following a thorough assessment of community needs and the capabilities and resources of the reference laboratory.

Virginia Hare

Immunohematology, Volume 5 , ISSUE 4, 111–114

Letter | 19-March-2020

Introduction to Vol. 25, No. 3, of Immunohematology

JamesP. AuBuchon

Immunohematology, Volume 25 , ISSUE 3, 89–89

Report | 21-March-2020

2008 Immunohematology Reference Laboratory Conference Summary of presentations

Elizabeth Cummings

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 2, 66–68

Report | 21-March-2020

2008 Immunohematology Reference Laboratory Conference Summary of presentations

Janis R. Hamilton

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 2, 68–70

Report | 21-March-2020

2008 Immunohematology Reference Laboratory Conference Summary of presentations

Patricia A. Arndt

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 2, 70–71

Report | 21-March-2020

2008 Immunohematology Reference Laboratory Conference Summary of presentations

George Garratty

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 2, 64–64

Report | 21-March-2020

2008 Immunohematology Reference Laboratory Conference Summary of presentations

George Garratty

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 2, 68–68

Report | 22-March-2020

2008 Immunohematology Reference Laboratory Conference Summary of presentations

Eva D. Quinley

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 2, 62–64

Review | 29-December-2020

A review: applications of flow cytometry in immunohematology

Sandra J. Nance

Immunohematology, Volume 4 , ISSUE 3, 49–53

Report | 31-December-2020

The Immunohematology Consultation Report: What, When, How Much?

Kathryn M. Beattie

Immunohematology, Volume 3 , ISSUE 4, 52–54

Review | 01-December-2019

Polyethylene glycol antiglobulin test  (PEG-AGT)

Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was described in 1987 as a new technique for immunohematology testing. The original paper described its use in detection and identification of weakly reactive antibodies. PEG is used as an additive to enhance reactivity and to reduce incubation time when testing for unexpected antibodies. PEG can be used as an alternative to low-ionicstrength saline and whenever weak reactions are encountered.

Larry Weldy

Immunohematology, Volume 30 , ISSUE 4, 158–160

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the JR blood group system

L. Castilho

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 2, 43–44

case-report | 25-June-2021

Anti-A1Leb: a mind boggler

against these compound antigens (e.g., anti-ALeb) has been shown to react only when RBCs possess both A and Leb together.1 Here, we describe the immunohematology workup of a rare and interesting case of incompatible crossmatches with negative indirect antiglobulin test and the antibody identified as anti-A1Leb. Case Report A 61-year-old male patient was admitted to a local hospital with complaints of hematemesis, abdominal distension, decreased appetite, weight loss, weakness, and itchy and yellow

A. Gupta, K. Chaudhary, S. Asati, B. Kakkar

Immunohematology, Volume 37 , ISSUE 2, 69–71

Report | 22-March-2020

2008 Immunohematology Reference Laboratory Conference Summary of presentations  

Theresa Heflin

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 2, 66–66

Report | 21-March-2020

2008 Immunohematology Reference Laboratory Conference Su mary of presentations

Eva D. Quinley

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 2, 64–66

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the Augustine blood group system

G. Daniels

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 1, 1–2

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the Lutheran blood group system

G. Daniels

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 1, 23–24

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the Duffy blood group system

G.M. Meny

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 1, 11–12

Article | 16-October-2019

Hemovigilance and the Notify Library

B.I. Whitaker, D.M. Strong, M.J. Gandhi, E. Petrisli

Immunohematology, Volume 33 , ISSUE 4, 159–164

Report | 25-March-2020

DNA-based assays for patient testing: their application, interpretation, and correlation of results

DNA analysis for the prediction of RBC phenotype has broad implication in transfusion medicine.  Hemagglutination testing, long the gold standard for immunohematology testing, has significant limitations.  DNA analysis affords a useful addition to the arsenal of methods used to resolve complex serologic investigations.  This report discusses the interpretation of results obtained by DNA analyses and their correlation with serologic results.  Some current applications to

Christine Lomas-Francis, Helene DePalma

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 4, 180–190

Article | 14-October-2020

A review of the Knops blood group: separating fact from fallacy

It has been more than 10 years since the topic of “high-titer, lowavidity” (HTLA) antibodies was reviewed in Immunohematology. We have learned a lot about these antibodies in the past 10 years and that knowledge has helped us to understand some of the unusual characteristics of these antibodies. Furthermore, it has helped us to name and delineate the various associated blood group systems. Although we will begin with a general review of HTLAs, this manuscript will focus on the

Joann M. Moulds

Immunohematology, Volume 18 , ISSUE 1, 1–8

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the Knops blood group system

J.M. Moulds

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 1, 16–18

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the MNS blood group system

L. Castilho

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 2, 61–62

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the Lewis blood group system

M.R. Combs

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 2, 65–66

Article | 17-February-2021

An update on the RAPH blood group system

M.A. Keller

Immunohematology, Volume 36 , ISSUE 2, 58–59

Report | 16-October-2019

Method-specific and unexplained reactivity in automated solid-phase testing and their association with specific antibodies

Mary E. Harach, Joy M. Gould, Rosemary P. Brown, Tricia Sander, Jay H. Herman

Immunohematology, Volume 34 , ISSUE 3, 93–97

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the CD59 blood group system

C. Weinstock, M. Anliker, I. von Zabern

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 1, 7–8

Report | 06-November-2019

Drugs that have been shown to cause druginduced immune hemolytic anemia or positive direct antiglobulin tests: some interesting findings since 2007

This review updates new findings in drug-induced immunehemolytic anemia (DIIHA) since the 2007 review in Immunohematology by these authors. Twelve additional drugs  have been added to the three tables listing drugs associated with drug-dependent antibodies, drugs associated with drug-independent antibodies, and drugs associated with nonimmunologic protein adsorption. Other updated findings include (1) piperacillin is currently the most commonly encountered cause of DIIHA, (2) new data on

George Garratty, Patricia A. Arndt

Immunohematology, Volume 30 , ISSUE 2, 66–79

Letter | 09-November-2020

Letters From the Editors: Immunohematology Is on the World Wide Web

Delores Mallory

Immunohematology, Volume 13 , ISSUE 1, 24–24

Letter | 16-November-2020

Letter From the Editors: Immunohematology Is on the World Wide Web

Delores Mallory, Mary McGinniss

Immunohematology, Volume 12 , ISSUE 4, 175–176

Article | 16-November-2020

Dealing with brittleness in the design of expert systems for immunohematology

Stephanie A. Guerlain, Philip J. Smith, Jodi Heintz Obradovich, Sally Rudmann, Patricia L. Strohm, Jack W. Smith, John Svirbely

Immunohematology, Volume 12 , ISSUE 3, 101–107

Introduction | 06-November-2019

Introduction to Immunohematology Special Edition on  Drug-Induced Immune Cytopenias

Patricia A. Arndt, Regina M. Leger

Immunohematology, Volume 30 , ISSUE 2, 43–43

Review | 16-October-2019

A review of in vitro methods to predict the clinical significance of red blood cell alloantibodies

This review was derived from a presentation made on September 2, 2016, for the first Academy Day presented by the Working Party on Immunohematology at the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) Congress in Dubai. The focus of this review is on the clinical significance of alloimmunization in transfusion—specifically, the parameters that contribute to a clinically significant alloantibody. The areas of focus were as follows: Introduction, Technical Aspects, and Indications and

Sandra J. Nance

Immunohematology, Volume 34 , ISSUE 1, 11–15

Article | 17-February-2021

The Xg blood group system: no longer forgotten

Y.Q. Lee, J.R. Storry, M.L. Olsson

Immunohematology, Volume 36 , ISSUE 1, 4–6

Review | 02-May-2020

Review: the Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group systems

After the discovery (over 50 years ago) that the IAT could be applied to the detection of antibodies to blood group antigens, there was a rapid increase in the identification of alloantibodies that caused transfusion reactions or HDN. After Rh, antibodies in the Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group systems were the next in clinically significant antibodies to be revealed. Much of what has been learned about these blood groups since the journal Immunohematology issued its first edition has to do

Constance M. Westhoff, Marion E. Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 20 , ISSUE 1, 37–49

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the H blood group system

E.A. Scharberg, C. Olsen, P. Bugert

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 2, 67–68

Article | 10-April-2021

A fatal case of acute hemolytic transfusion reaction caused by anti-Wra: case report and review of the literature

A. Espinosa, L.J. Garvik, N. Trung Nguyen, B. Jacobsen

Immunohematology, Volume 37 , ISSUE 1, 20–24

Review | 16-October-2019

A brief overview of clinical significance of blood group antibodies

This review was derived from a presentation made on September 2, 2016 for the first Academy Day presented by the Working Party on Immunohematology at the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) Congress in Dubai. The focus of this review is to provide a brief overview of the clinical significance of blood group antibodies. Blood group antibodies can be naturally occurring (e.g., anti-A and anti-B through exposure to naturally occurring red blood cell [RBC] antigen-like substances) or

Manish J. Gandhi, D. Michael Strong, Barbee I. Whitaker, Evangelia Petrisli

Immunohematology, Volume 34 , ISSUE 1, 4–6

Report | 12-March-2020

Occurrence of antibodies to low-incidence antigens among a cohort of multiply transfused patients with sickle cell disease

Data from an immunohematology reference laboratory were compiled retrospectively to determine the occurrence of the formation of alloantibodies to low-incidence antigens associated with the African American population (AA-LIAs) among patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The AA-LIAs under study were V, VS, Jsa, and Goa. The records from 137 recurrently transfused patients with SCD were selected on the basis of transfusion activity from the 2009 calendar year. We found that 13 patients (9.49

Pamela Jackson

Immunohematology, Volume 27 , ISSUE 4, 143–145

Review | 01-December-2019

Scianna: the lucky 13th blood group system

The Scianna system was named in 1974 when it was appreciated that two antibodies described in 1962 in fact identified antithetical antigens. However, it was not until 2003 that the protein on which antigens of this system are found and the first molecular variants were described. Scianna was the last previously serologically defined, protein-based blood group system to be characterized at the molecular level, marking the end of an era in immunohematology. This story highlights the critical role

Patricia A.R. Brunker, Willy A. Flegel

Immunohematology, Volume 27 , ISSUE 2, 41–57

Article | 03-November-2020

The immunoglobulin molecule

Antibodies, or immunoglobulins, have been used for many years in immunohematology and yet the complexity of these molecules is rarely considered. This review concentrates on IgG and IgM molecules, as these are most usually found in transfusion laboratories. The basic structure and function of the immunoglobulin molecule are addressed at both the protein and the gene level, and isotypes, allotypes, and idiotypes are introduced. Although the antibody molecules secreted by each B cell have a

Janet Sutherland

Immunohematology, Volume 14 , ISSUE 1, 12–18

Article | 22-January-2021

The P1PK blood group system: revisited and resolved

L. Stenfelt, Å. Hellberg, J.S. Westman, M.L. Olsson

Immunohematology, Volume 36 , ISSUE 3, 99–103

Letter | 16-May-2020

Letter to the Editor-in-Chief: Immunohematology to be listed in Index Medicus and MEDLINE

S.Gerald Sandler

Immunohematology, Volume 20 , ISSUE 3, 193–194

Article | 16-February-2021

An update on the I blood group system

L. Cooling

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 3, 85–90

Article | 16-February-2021

An update on the Chido/Rodgers blood group system

R. Mougey

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 4, 135–138

Article | 16-February-2021

An update on the Cartwright (Yt) blood group system

M.R. George

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 4, 154–155

Article | 16-October-2019

Clinical and laboratory profile of anti-M

D. Basu, S. Basu, M. Reddy, K. Gupta, M. Chandy

Immunohematology, Volume 33 , ISSUE 4, 165–169

Case report | 01-December-2019

Weak D type 42 cases found in individuals of European descent

Patient samples were referred to our immunohematology reference laboratory to investigate the presence of a weak D antigen. In the last 3 years, 26 samples were received. Serology and molecular analyses were performed to identify the weak D variant. RHD mRNA from all patients was reverse transcribed, and cDNA was sequenced. The results were compared with a normal RHD sequence to identify the polymorphisms causing the weak D phenotype. Five different already known RHD variants were observed

Maryse St-Louis, Martine Richard, Marie Côté, Carole Éthier, Anne Long

Immunohematology, Volume 27 , ISSUE 1, 20–24

Article | 16-February-2021

Use of trypsin in serologic investigation

, centrifuge, and re-suspend RBCs to examine for agglutination. PBS = phosphate-buffered saline; RBCs = red blood cells. Trypsin is not often used in the routine laboratory, but is a vital tool in the Immunohematology Reference Laboratory (IRL). Because of its differing pattern of reactivity from papain and ficin, trypsin is a key proteolytic enzyme used in serologic investigation of complex antibody workups. Trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen are inactive precursors to the proteolytic enzymes

A. Novotny

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 4, 145–148

Review | 01-December-2019

The LAN blood group system: a review

Thierry Peyrard

Immunohematology, Volume 29 , ISSUE 4, 131–135

Case report | 01-December-2019

A case of masquerading alloantibodies:  the value of a multitechnique approach

In an immunohematology reference laboratory, samples received for antibody identification react in many different ways requiring a variety of approaches. Sometimes, the clues from initial testing can lead to faulty assumptions and misdirection. Fortunately, a well-supplied reference laboratory will have access to a variety of techniques and reagents that, when used together, can reveal the true identity of the antibodies involved. We present a case of a patient sample with an apparent group AB

Paula M.S. Wennersten, Laurie J. Sutor

Immunohematology, Volume 30 , ISSUE 3, 117–120

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the Scianna blood group system

P.A.R. Brunker, W.A. Flegel

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 2, 48–50

Case report | 26-October-2019

Severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-C+G

immunohematology laboratory and the obstetric unit is essential. In previously affected families, early assessment for fetal anemia is required even when titers are low.

Riina Jernman, Vedran Stefanovic, Anu Korhonen, Katri Haimila, Inna Sareneva, Kati Sulin, Malla Kuosmanen, Susanna Sainio

Immunohematology, Volume 31 , ISSUE 3, 123–127

Report | 21-March-2020

Summary of the Caribbean subregional workshop on quality in immunohematology,a collaborative effort to improve international blood transfusion services

Jose R. Cruz, Denise M. Harmening, Sandra J. Nance

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 1, 1–3

Review | 09-October-2019

The Vel blood group system: a review

The blood group antigen Vel has been one of immunohematology’s greatest enigmas: the variation in antigen strength from one individual to another, the property of anti-Vel to readily hemolyze Vel+ red blood cells (RBCs), and the difficulty to screen for sufficient numbers of Vel– blood donors had made Vel a tough nut to crack. In 2013, a small, previously unknown protein called small integral membrane protein 1 (SMIM1) was identified on the RBC by three independent research groups

Jill R. Storry, Thierry Peyrard

Immunohematology, Volume 33 , ISSUE 2, 56–59

Report | 12-March-2020

Determination of optimal method for antibody identification in a reference laboratory

Methods commonly used for antibody identification are hemagglutination (tube), column agglutination (gel), and solid-phase red cell adherence. Our AABB immunohematology reference laboratory (IRL) conducted a study to determine which antibody identification testing method was optimal for detecting all clinically significant antibodies. Patient specimens were sent to our IRL from August 2008 to September 2009. Routine testing was performed by tube method and then by manual gel and manual solid

Jennifer R. Haywood, Marilyn K. Grandstaff Moulds, Barbara J. Bryant

Immunohematology, Volume 27 , ISSUE 4, 146–150

Article | 10-April-2021

Acute hemolytic transfusion reaction caused by anti-Yta

M. Raos, N. Thornton, M. Lukic, B. Golubic Cepulic

Immunohematology, Volume 37 , ISSUE 1, 13–17

Article | 31-March-2021

Transfusion support during childbirth for a woman with anti-U and the RHD*weak D type 4.0 allele

treated as D+.3 The molecular analysis should be performed early in a pregnancy. This approach, which was missed at the first-time maternity visit in our patient, would have allowed for an efficient organization of RBC genotyping with or without antibody identification. Most hospitals would typically send samples to an immunohematology reference laboratory. In our case, while birth was imminent, the shipping and testing was accomplished within 5 days, including a weekend. The extra cost inflicted by

Q. Yin, K. Srivastava, D.G. Brust, W.A. Flegel

Immunohematology, Volume 37 , ISSUE 1, 1–4

Case report | 09-October-2019

A LU:-16 individual with antibodies

Antibodies against Lutheran blood group antigens have been observed during first-time pregnancy. Samples from a woman of African descent were tested in our immunohematology laboratory on several occasions since 2001. Her samples were phenotyped as Lu(a+b−), and anti-Lub was suspected but not identified. She was asked to make autologous donations in preparation for her delivery, which she did. In 2010, two antibodies were identified: anti-Lea and -Lub. Six years later, a third

Carole Éthier, Cynthia Parent, Anne-Sophie Lemay, Nadia Baillargeon, Geneviève Laflamme, Josée Lavoie, Josée Perreault, Maryse St-Louis

Immunohematology, Volume 33 , ISSUE 3, 110–113

Article | 17-February-2021

An outcome-based review of an accredited Specialist in Blood Banking (SBB) program: 25 years and counting

= National Institutes of Health. Career Advancement, Scholarships, and Satisfaction Surveys NIH graduates were able to find positions, most being employed at hospitals, blood centers, or Immunohematology References Laboratories (IRLs) (Table 2). Submission for the AABB Future Leaders Scholarship (previously known as AABB Fenwal Scholarship Award) is above 80 percent, with more than half of our submissions resulting in receipt of an award (Table 3). We initially had few submissions for the Suzanne

K.M. Byrne, T.D. Paige, W.A. Flegel

Immunohematology, Volume 36 , ISSUE 1, 7–13

Article | 10-April-2021

Group O blood donors in Iran: evaluation of isoagglutinin titers and immunoglobulin G subclasses

-titer group]) were selected randomly. Unexpected antibodies and IgG subclasses were evaluated on these samples. Alloantibody Detection The presence of antibody against D, C, c, E, e, K, k, Fya, Fyb, Jka, Jkb, M, N, S, s, P1, Lea, and Leb antigens was evaluated using standard reagent RBCs: Cell I, Cell II, and Cell III. These three reagent RBCs were prepared according to the Immunohematology Reference Laboratory at IBTO. Three tubes were labeled as I, II, and III for each sample, and two drops of

S. Arabi, M. Moghaddam, A.A. Pourfathollah, A. Aghaie, M. Mosaed

Immunohematology, Volume 37 , ISSUE 1, 5–12

Case report | 09-October-2019

Development of red blood cell autoantibodies following treatment with checkpoint inhibitors: a new class of anti-neoplastic, immunotherapeutic agents associated with immune dysregulation

associated with the development of autoantibodies, immune-mediated cytopenias, pure RBC aplasia, and aplastic anemia. Immunohematology reference laboratories should be aware of these agents when evaluating patients with advanced cancer and new-onset autoantibodies, anemia, and other cytopenias.

Laura L.W. Cooling, John Sherbeck, Jonathon C. Mowers, Sheri L. Hugan

Immunohematology, Volume 33 , ISSUE 1, 15–21

Report | 14-March-2020

Absence of hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn despite maternal high-titer IgG anti-Ku

Ram M. Kakaiya, Angelica Whaley, Christine Howard-Menk, Jigna Rami, Mona Papari, Sally Campbell-Lee, Zbigniew Malecki

Immunohematology, Volume 26 , ISSUE 3, 119–122

Article | 22-January-2021

Routine indirect antiglobulin testing of blood donors—a further step toward blood safety: an experience from a tertiary care center in northern India

center at the time we established an immunohematology (IH) workup laboratory. We also report the incidence of RBC alloimmunization in healthy blood donors from a tertiary care center in northern India. Material and Methods A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted in the Department of Transfusion Medicine at a tertiary care referral and teaching institute from September 2017 to January 2019 to assess the incidence of RBC alloimmunization in healthy blood donors. The blood donors were

S. Malhotra, G. Negi, D. Kaur, S.K. Meinia, A.K. Tiwari, S. Mitra

Immunohematology, Volume 36 , ISSUE 3, 93–98

Report | 26-October-2019

First example of an FY*01 allele associated with weakened expression of Fya on red blood cells

Duffy antigens are important in immunohematology. The reference allele for the Duffy gene (FY) is FY*02, which encodes Fyb. An A>G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at coding nucleotide (c.) 125 in exon 2 defines the FY*01 allele, which encodes the antithetical Fya. A C>T SNP at c.265 in the FY*02 allele is associated with weakening of Fyb expression on red blood cells (RBCs) (called FyX). Until recently, this latter change had not been described on a FY*01 background allele

Patricia A. Arndt, Trina Horn, Jessica A Keller, Rochelle Young, Suzanne M. Heri, Margaret A. Keller

Immunohematology, Volume 31 , ISSUE 3, 103–107

Report | 09-October-2019

Distribution of blood groups in the Iranian general population

We report the first study of antigen and phenotype prevalence within various blood group systems in the Iranian general population. In this retrospective study, samples from 3475 individuals referred to the Immunohematology Reference Laboratory of the Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran, Iran, for paternity testing from 1998 to 2008 were additionally tested for red blood cell (RBC) antigens in the Rh, Kell, Kidd, Duffy, MNS, Lutheran, P1PK, and Xg blood group systems. The antigen

Ehsan Shahverdi, Mostafa Moghaddam, Ali Talebian, Hassan Abolghasemi

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 4, 135–139

Review | 20-March-2020

Historic milestones in the evolution of the crossmatch

introduction of the serologic crossmatch—100 years ago—had a major positive impact on all aspects of clinical medicine. As a result of these advances, we are quickly approaching the limits of improving the safety and efficacy of blood transfusions by conventional serologic methods. Future improvements are more likely to be the result of applications of molecular genotyping—which could not have become available at a more perfect time. When Immunohematology publishes its 50th-anniversary

S. Gerald Sandler, Malak M. Abedalthagafi

Immunohematology, Volume 25 , ISSUE 4, 147–151

Article | 10-April-2021

An automated approach to determine antibody endpoint titers for COVID-19 by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

A.D. Ho, H. Verkerke, J.W. Allen, B.J. Saeedi, D. Boyer, J. Owens, S. Shin, M. Horwath, K. Patel, A. Paul, S.-C. Wu, S. Chonat, P. Zerra, C. Lough, J.D. Roback, A. Neish, C.D. Josephson, C.M. Arthur, S.R. Stowell

Immunohematology, Volume 37 , ISSUE 1, 33–43

Article | 10-April-2021

Comparative evaluation of the conventional tube test and column agglutination technology for ABO antibody titration in healthy individuals: a report from India

reciprocal to the highest sample dilution showing 1+ agglutination. Dithiothreitol (DTT) is used for the inactivation of IgM antibodies and, therefore, its routine use in immunohematology laboratories is recommended.5 Although the column agglutination technology (CAT) has been described as superior in objectivity and reproducibility when compared with CTT because of the possible overestimation of the antibody titer when using CAT, it has, up to now, only been recommended for antibody identification and

S.S. Datta, S. Basu, M. Reddy, K. Gupta, S. Sinha

Immunohematology, Volume 37 , ISSUE 1, 25–32

Review | 09-October-2019

Finnish national rare donor program

Inna M. Sareneva, Susanne Ekblom-Kullberg

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 1, 21–21

Introduction | 09-October-2019

Introduction

Sandra Nance, Christine Lomas-Francis

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 1, 1–2

Review | 09-October-2019

The Israeli rare donor blood program

Vered Yahalom, Lilach Finkel, Eilat Shinar, Orna Asher

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 1, 29–31

Review | 09-October-2019

Rare donor programs in Belgium

Anne Vanhonsebrouck, T. Najdovski

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 1, 9–10

Review | 09-October-2019

Rare blood program in China

Ziyan Zhu, Chen Wang, Luyi Ye, Qin Li, Zhonghui Guo, Jiamin Zhang, Shasha Han, Qixiu Yang

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 1, 17–19

Review | 09-October-2019

Rare donor program: Canadian Blood Services

Mindy Goldman, Lisa St. Croix

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 1, 15–16

Review | 09-October-2019

Rare donor program in Italy

Cinzia Paccapelo, Francesca Truglio, Maria Antonietta Villa, Nicoletta Revelli, Maria Cristina Manera, Elisa Erba, Maurizio Marconi

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 2, 47–48

Review | 09-October-2019

Requests for red cells with rare blood types in the Netherlands

Jessie S. Luken, Fikreta Danovic, Masja de Haas, Rianne (M.M.W.) Koopman

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 2, 51–52

Review | 09-October-2019

Rare donor programs in Switzerland, Germany, and Austria

Hein Hustinx, Sofia Lejon Crottet, Erwin A. Scharberg, Christof Weinstock

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 2, 63–66

Commentary | 09-October-2019

Miracles do happen: meeting the challenges of providing rare blood through the American Rare Donor Program

Cynthia Flickinger

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 2, 75–77

Review | 09-October-2019

Singapore rare donor program

Ramir Alcantara, Jason Chay, Ai Leen Ang

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 2, 55–56

Introduction | 09-October-2019

Introduction

Sandra Nance, Christine Lomas-Francis

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 2, 45–46

Case report | 09-October-2019

Autoanti-C in a patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a rare presentation

Meenu Bajpai, Ashish Maheshwari, Shruti Gupta, Chhagan Bihari

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 3, 104–107

Review | 09-October-2019

How to recognize and resolve reagentdependent reactivity: a review

Gavin C. Patch, Charles F. Hutchinson, Nancy A. Lang, Ghada Khalife

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 3, 96–99

Review | 09-October-2019

The Spanish program for rare blood donors

Eduardo Muñiz-Diaz, Ana Castro, Elena Flores, Luis Larrea, Fernando Puente, Marisa Ayape, Miguel Angel Pérez-Vaquero

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 2, 59–61

Review | 09-October-2019

The New Zealand rare donor program

D. Gounder

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 2, 53–53

In Memoriam | 09-October-2019

Mary Harrell McGinniss, BB(ASCP), 1925–2016

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 3, 119–120

Report | 09-October-2019

Human platelet antigen allelic diversity in Peninsular Malaysia

Wan Ubaidillah Wan Syafawati, Zulkafli Zefarina, Zafarina Zafarina, Mohd Nazri Hassan, Mohd Nor Norazmi, Sundararajulu Panneerchelvam, Geoffrey Keith Chambers, Hisham Atan Edinur

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 4, 143–160

Report | 09-October-2019

Trends of ABO and Rh phenotypes in transfusion-dependent patients in Pakistan

Nida Anwar, Munira Borhany, Saqib Ansari, Sana Khurram, Uzma Zaidi, Imran Naseer, Muhammad Nadeem, Tahir Shamsi

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 4, 170–173

Report | 09-October-2019

A detailed flow cytometric method for detection of low-level in vivo red blood  cell–bound IgG, IgA, and IgM

Wendy Beres, Geralyn M. Meny, Sandra Nance

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 4, 161–169

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