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  • Immunohematology

 

Article | 10-April-2021

A fatal case of acute hemolytic transfusion reaction caused by anti-Wra: case report and review of the literature

Wra is the most common low-prevalence antigen (LPA) in the white population, and anti-Wra is the most common naturally occurring antibody.1 The first case of anti-Wra was described by Holman2 in 1953 in a child with severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), requiring exchange transfusion. Anti-Wra is often identified when Wr(a+) red blood cells (RBCs) are available on the screening or identification panel RBCs, but the antibody is otherwise rarely involved in serious hemolytic

A. Espinosa, L.J. Garvik, N. Trung Nguyen, B. Jacobsen

Immunohematology, Volume 37 , ISSUE 1, 20–24

Case report | 09-October-2019

Hemolytic transfusion reaction attributable to anti-Dia  

(RBCs) in the apheresis unit as part of her regular treatment. When the patient started receiving the implicated unit, she reported back pain, chest pain, and a feeling of anxiety, suggestive of an acute transfusion reaction. The transfusion was ceased and an investigation of an adverse event was commenced. This case illustrates that the presence of antibodies to low-prevalence antigens remains a significant issue for transfusion-dependent individuals. To prevent other transfusion reactions by anti

Arthur J. Joyce, Kelli M Quantock, Ray Banh, Yew-Wah Liew

Immunohematology, Volume 33 , ISSUE 1, 6–8

Case report | 24-March-2020

Overt immediate hemolytic transfusion reaction attributable to anti-Wra

Wra is a low-prevalence antigen.  Anti-Wra is a relatively common antibody present in approximately 1 in 100 healthy blood donors.  Anti-Wra is reported to cause different degrees of hemolysis in transfusion and in HDN, ranging from benign to severe.  This report describes an acute overt hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient whose serum contained anti-Wra and who received a Wr(a+) RBC component.

Fouad N. Boctor

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 3, 113–115

Case report | 26-October-2019

Suspected acute hemolytic transfusion reaction mediated by anti-Dia

Ashwini Bennett, Ray K. Boyapati, Frank S. Hong

Immunohematology, Volume 31 , ISSUE 4, 163–165

Report | 11-March-2020

Should we be screening for anti-Jsa?

Nancy M. Nikolis, Fouad Boctor, William Andrew Heaton, James Martone

Immunohematology, Volume 27 , ISSUE 3, 104–106

Report | 01-December-2019

Prevalence of RHD*DOL and RHCE*ce(818T)  in two populations

Christine Halter Hipsky, Daiane Cobianchi da Costa, Ricardo Omoto, Angela Zanette, Lilian Castilho, Marion E. Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 27 , ISSUE 2, 66–67

Review | 09-October-2019

The FORS awakens: review of a blood group system reborn

Annika K. Hult, Martin L. Olsson

Immunohematology, Volume 33 , ISSUE 2, 64–72

Review | 01-December-2019

The Diego blood group system: a review

The Diego blood group system (DI) currently encompasses 22 antigens. Three of the antigens are of high prevalence and the other 19 are of low prevalence. The antigens of the Diego blood group system are carried on the erythroid band 3 protein anion exchanger 1 (AE1), the product of a single gene, SLC4A1 (solute carrier family 4, anion exchanger, member 1). AE1 is a member of a family of three anion exchangers or transporters expressed in a variety of tissues. This protein is involved in carbon

Dolores Figueroa

Immunohematology, Volume 29 , ISSUE 2, 73–81

Review | 12-March-2020

The Gerbich blood group system: a review

Antigens in the Gerbich blood group system are expressed on glycophorin C (GPC) and glycophorin D (GPD), which are both encoded by a single gene, GYPC. The GYPC gene is located on the long arm of chromosome 2, and Gerbich antigens are inherited as autosomal dominant traits. There are 11 antigens in the Gerbich blood group system, six of high prevalence (Ge2, Ge3, Ge4, GEPL [Ge10*], GEAT [Ge11*], GETI [Ge12*]) and five of low prevalence (Wb [Ge5], Lsa [Ge6], Ana [Ge7], Dha [Ge8], GEIS [Ge9

Phyllis S. Walker, Marion E. Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 26 , ISSUE 2, 60–65

Review | 20-March-2020

MNS blood group system: a review

The MNS blood group system is second only to the Rh blood group system in its complexity. Many alloantibodies to antigens in the MNS system are not generally clinically significant although antibodies to low-prevalence and high-prevalence MNS antigens have caused hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. The MNS antigens are carried on glycophorin A (GPA), glycophorin B (GPB), or hybrids thereof, which arise from single-nucleotide substitution, unequal crossing over, or gene conversion

Marion E. Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 25 , ISSUE 3, 95–101

Article | 21-April-2020

Analysis of SERF in Thai blood donors

The Cromer blood group system consists of nine high-prevalence and three low-prevalence antigens carried on decay-accelerating factor (DAF). We recently described one of these Cromer highprevalence antigens,SERF,the absence of which was found in a Thai woman.The lack of SERF antigen in this proband was associated with a substitution of nucleotide 647C>T in exon 5 of DAF, which is predicted to be a change of proline to leucine at amino acid position 182 in short consensus repeat (SCR) 3 of

Poonsub Palacajornsuk, Kim Hue-Roye, Oytip Nathalang, Srisurang Tantimavanich, Sasitorn Bejrachandra, Marion Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 21 , ISSUE 2, 66–69

Article | 21-April-2020

Novel molecular basis of an Inab phenotype  

The Cromer blood group system consists of ten high-prevalence and three low-prevalence antigens carried on decay-accelerating factor (DAF). DAF is found in the cell membranes of RBCs, granulocytes,platelets,and lymphocytes and is widely represented in other body tissues. Sequence analyses of DNA were performed on a blood sample from a 91-year-old Japanese woman whose serum contained an alloantibody to a high-prevalence antigen in the Cromer blood group system (anti-IFC). A blood sample from her

Kim Hue-Roye, Vivien E. Powell, Gita Patel, Debra Lane, Mariska Maguire, Amy Chung, Marion E. Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 21 , ISSUE 2, 53–55

Review | 21-April-2020

Review: Cromer and DAF: role in health and disease

The antigens of the Cromer blood group system are located on the protein decay-accelerating factor (DAF). This system consists of ten high-prevalence and three low-prevalence antigens; the molecular basis for all of these antigens is a single nucleotide polymorphism in the DAF gene. DAF is a 70,000-Da plasma membrane protein that is widely distributed on all blood cells and on endothelial and epithelial tissues. The physiological role of DAF is to inhibit the complement cascade at the level of

Douglas M. Lublin

Immunohematology, Volume 21 , ISSUE 2, 39–47

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the Scianna blood group system

lacking low-prevalence antigens. An important recent report of an acute hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-Sc2 provides an excellent example of the potential adverse consequences of categorizing low-prevalence antibodies as “clinically insignificant.”10 In their patient with a previously identified anti-Sc2, electronic or immediate-spin crossmatches were performed rather than compatibility testing using an indirect antiglobulin test because of an assumption that anti-Sc2 was not clinically

P.A.R. Brunker, W.A. Flegel

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 2, 48–50

Article | 01-April-2020

An alloantibody to a highprevalence MNS antigen in a person with a GP.JL/Mk phenotype

The low-prevalence MNS blood group antigenTSEN is located at the junction of glycophorinA (GPA) to glycophorin B (GPB) in several hybrid glycophorin molecules. Extremely rare people have RBCs with a double dose of theTSEN antigen and have made an antibody to a high-prevalence MNS antigen. We report the first patient who is heterozygous for GYP.JL and Mk. During prenatal tests,an alloantibody to a high-prevalence antigen was detected in the serum of a 21-year-old Hispanic woman. The antibody

John Ratliff, Susan Veneman, Joan Ward, Christine Lomas-Francis, Kim Hue-Roye, Randall W. Velliquette, Laima Sausais, Twilla Maldonado, Janet Miyamoto, Yolanda Martin, David Slater, Marion E. Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 23 , ISSUE 4, 146–149

Original Paper | 04-December-2017

Study of Patterns and Markers of Human Immune Deficiency Virus -1 (HIV-1) Progression and Unemployment Rate among Patients from Alexandria, Egypt

Middle East and North Africa (MENA) new HIV cases show the highest increase among all regions in the world. Even though Egypt has a low prevalence among the general population (< 0.02%), a national HIV epidemic occurs in certain population risk groups. The current study was conducted to asses clinical and immunological disease progression; following up viral load (VL) and detecting delta-32 CCR5 genotype polymorphism in selected cases, determining unemployment rate and identify predictors of

Faika M. Ghoneim, May M. Raouf, Noha S. Elshaer, Sarah M. Abdelhamid, Reem A. Noor Eldeen

Polish Journal of Microbiology, Volume 66 , ISSUE 4, 519–527

Article | 17-February-2021

A resource-conserving serologic and high-throughput molecular approach to screen for blood donors with an IN:−5 phenotype

The Indian blood group antigen Ina was recognized in the early 1970s when an antibody to a low-prevalence antigen was assigned the symbol after the name of the country where it was first found.1 It received blood group system status after its antithetical antibody, called Salis, directed to a high-prevalence antigen (HPA) was reviewed and renamed as Inb.2 The system was further expanded when four more HPAs, namely, INFI, INJA, INRA, and INSL, were found befitting to the system.3–5 Although Ina

S.R. Joshi, S.B. Senjaliya, K. Srivastava, W.A. Flegel

Immunohematology, Volume 36 , ISSUE 4, 129–132

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