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  • Journal Of Nematology

 

research-article | 30-November-2018

A draft genome for a species of Halicephalobus (Panagrolaimidae)

colonize such habitats suggests that comparative genomics of the genus may yield clues into the mechanisms enabling unusual lifestyles. It is possible that the mode of reproduction in all known Halicephalobus species, obligate parthenogenesis, also aids in the colonization of new, sometimes extreme habitats, by requiring only a single individual to found a population. Because the common ancestor of Panagrolaimus and Halicephalobus was most likely gonochoristic (dioecious) (Lewis et al., 2009

Erik J. Ragsdale, Georgios Koutsovoulos, Joseph F. Biddle

journal of nematology, Volume 51 , 1–4

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