Search

  • Select Article Type
  • Abstract Supplements
  • Blood Group Review
  • Call to Arms
  • Hypothesis
  • In Memoriam
  • Interview
  • Introduction
  • Letter to the Editor
  • Short Report
  • abstract
  • Abstracts
  • Article
  • book-review
  • case-report
  • case-study
  • Clinical Practice
  • Commentary
  • Conference Presentation
  • conference-report
  • congress-report
  • Correction
  • critical-appraisal
  • Editorial
  • Editorial Comment
  • Erratum
  • Events
  • Letter
  • Letter to Editor
  • mini-review
  • minireview
  • News
  • non-scientific
  • Obituary
  • original-paper
  • original-report
  • Original Research
  • Pictorial Review
  • Position Paper
  • Practice Report
  • Preface
  • Preliminary report
  • Product Review
  • rapid-communication
  • Report
  • research-article
  • Research Communicate
  • research-paper
  • Research Report
  • Review
  • review -article
  • review-article
  • review-paper
  • Review Paper
  • Sampling Methods
  • Scientific Commentary
  • short-communication
  • short-report
  • Student Essay
  • Varia
  • Welome
  • Select Journal
  • Immunohematology

 

Article | 26-October-2020

EDTA/glycine-acid versus chloroquine diphosphate treatment for stripping Bg antigens from red blood cells

EDTA/glycine-acid (EGA) has been reported to remove IgG-bound antibodies from red blood cells (RBCs) and to denature Kell system and Era antigens. EGA-treated RBCs were tested in parallel with chloroquine diphosphate (CDP)-treated RBCs to evaluate whether EGA would remove Bg antigens from RBCs as efficiently as CDP. Fifty-seven serum/plasma samples containing known Bg antibodies were tested with untreated Bg+ RBCs, EGA-treated Bg+ RBCs, and CDP-treated Bg+ RBCs by an indirect antiglobulin test

Kayla D. Champagne, Peggy Spruell, Jane Chen, Leslie Voll, Gloria Schlanser

Immunohematology, Volume 15 , ISSUE 2, 66–68

Article | 16-October-2019

Assessment of common red blood cell pretreatments to yield an accurate serologic antigen phenotype compared with genotype-predicted phenotype

or by a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). Because a donor RBC can survive in circulation for up to 120 days, it is not recommended to phenotype individuals who have been transfused in the past 3 months.6 In addition, phenotyping with certain types of antisera may be hindered in patients with autoantibodies causing a positive DAT. In these scenarios, methods—such as EDTA glycine acid (EGA) treatment to remove IgG, hypotonic wash to separate autologous cells from patients with sickle cell

T. Horn, J. Hamilton, J. Kosanke, V.W. Hare, W. Kluver, W. Beres, S. Nance, M.A. Keller

Immunohematology, Volume 33 , ISSUE 4, 147–151

No Record Found..
Page Actions