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Review | 09-October-2019

The H blood group system

The H blood group system, ISBT symbol H (018), consists of a single antigen (H) defined by a terminal fucose residue found on red blood cells and in secretions formed by the action of α-1,2-fucosyltransferases 1 (α2FucT1) and 2 (α2FucT2), respectively. Mutant alleles of the corresponding FUT1 and FUT2 genes result in either a H– phenotype (Bombay phenotype, Oh) or a weak H phenotype (para-Bombay, H+w). In addition, the FUT2 gene is the molecular basis of the secretor (Se

Erwin Andreas Scharberg, Coral Olsen, Peter Bugert

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 3, 112–118

Article | 15-February-2021

An update on the H blood group system

E.A. Scharberg, C. Olsen, P. Bugert

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 2, 67–68

case-report | 30-November-2020

Blood group discrepancy in Ah para-Bombay phenotype: a rare blood group variant and its clinical significance

secretions. Serologically, the para-Bombay phenotypes can be distinguished from Bombay phenotype as outlined in Table 3. The FUT2 gene present in para-Bombay converts type 1 precursor chain to type 1H, which on further action by A or B enzymes is converted to type 1A or type 1B, respectively. Trace amounts of ABH on RBCs may be detectable because of adsorption of these antigens from plasma; but in some instances, even adsorption and elution studies cannot detect them.8 We also encountered no or very

M.S. Bhagavathi, N. Das, S. Prakash, A. Sahu, S. Routray, S. Mukherjee

Immunohematology, Volume 37 , ISSUE 4, 160–164

case-report | 25-June-2021

Neonatal testing leading to the identification of Bh (para-Bombay) phenotype in the mother: case report with review of the literature

The Bombay phenotype was identified in 1952 by Bhende and colleagues.1 The Bombay phenotype results from a homozygous deficiency of the FUT1 gene along with a silenced mutation of the FUT2 gene. The incidence of the Bombay phenotype in the Indian population is approximately 1 in 10,000 and is most often due to a T725G mutation in the FUT1 gene and a 10-kb deletion in the FUT2 gene.2 The para-Bombay phenotype is either due to a point mutation or a silence mutation on the FUT1 gene with a normal

G. Mohan, A. Vaidya, S. Shastry

Immunohematology, Volume 37 , ISSUE 2, 59–63

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