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  • Immunohematology

 

Case report | 01-December-2019

Possible suppression of fetal erythropoiesis by the Kell blood group antibody anti-Kpa

Antibodies to antigens in the Kell blood group system are usually immunoglobulin G, and, notoriously, anti-K, anti-k, and anti-Kpa can cause severe hemolytic transfusion reactions, as well as severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). It has been shown that the titer of anti-K does not correlate with the severity of HDFN because, in addition to immune destruction of red blood cells (RBCs), anti-K causes suppression of erythropoiesis in the fetus, which can result in severe anemia

Michelle Tuson, Kim Hue-Roye, Karen Koval, Sherwin Imlay, Rajendra Desai, Gayatri Garg, Esam Kazem, Diane Stockman, Janis S. Hamilton, Marion E. Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 27 , ISSUE 2, 58–60

Case report | 01-December-2019

Alloimmunization to Kell blood group system antigen owing to unmatched blood transfusion in a resource-poor setting

Sheetal Malhotra, Gagandeep Kaur, Sabita Basu, Ravneet Ravneet, Geetanjali Jindal

Immunohematology, Volume 28 , ISSUE 2, 45–48

Case report | 29-October-2019

Evans syndrome in a pediatric liver transplant recipient with an autoantibody with apparent specificity for the KEL4 (Kpb) antigen  

Although most warm red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies react broadly with panel cells in addition to the patient’s own RBCs, occasionally an autoantibody with specificity for a specific blood group antigen is encountered. Rare cases of warm autoantibodies with specificity for the Kpb antigen of the Kell blood group system have been described. We report a pediatric transplant recipient with anemia, immune-mediated hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and a warm autoantibody with apparent anti-Kpb

Scott A. Koepsell, Kerry Burright-Hittner, James D. Landmark

Immunohematology, Volume 30 , ISSUE 1, 14–17

Report | 16-October-2019

Rh and Kell blood group antigen prevalence in a multi-ethnic cohort in Nigeria: implications for local transfusion service

Antigens belonging to the Rh and Kell blood group systems are of major clinical significance because of their immunogenicity and the potential of their consequent antibodies to cause in vivo destruction of exogenous red blood cells (RBCs). Despite the widespread use of transfusion, there are sparse data on the prevalence of Rh and Kell system antigens and their ethnic variability in Nigeria. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of the five major Rh (D, C, c, E, e) and

Ademola Samson Adewoyin, Grace Ming Lee, Titilope Adenike Adeyemo, Omolade Augustina Awodu

Immunohematology, Volume 34 , ISSUE 2, 61–65

Review | 06-December-2020

Review: developments in the Kell blood group system

W. Laurence Marsh, Colvin M. Redman

Immunohematology, Volume 9 , ISSUE 1, 1–6

Report | 14-March-2020

Absence of hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn despite maternal high-titer IgG anti-Ku

elution of RBC antibodies, and antigen typing. A gravida 3, para 3 (G3P3) woman was first evaluated in 2006 and was found to have an IgG RBC antibody that reacted against all panel RBCs in the anti-human globulin phase. A panel of RBCs treated with DTT did not react with the antibody.  The antibody failed to react with one example of K0 RBCs. The patient’s RBCs typed negative for the following Kell blood group antigens: KEL1, KEL2, KEL3, KEL4, KEL6, KEL7, KEL11, KEL13, and KEL18. These

Ram M. Kakaiya, Angelica Whaley, Christine Howard-Menk, Jigna Rami, Mona Papari, Sally Campbell-Lee, Zbigniew Malecki

Immunohematology, Volume 26 , ISSUE 3, 119–122

Article | 03-November-2020

K phenotyping using a PK-7200 automated analyzer

Marcia C. Zago-Novaretti, Silvana P. Navarro, Pedro E. Dorlhiac-Llacer, Dalton A.F. Chamone

Immunohematology, Volume 14 , ISSUE 1, 22–25

Review | 01-December-2019

EDTA glycine acid treatment of red blood cells

blood group system and for the high-prevalence antigen Era.

Joanne Kosanke

Immunohematology, Volume 28 , ISSUE 3, 95–96

Review | 26-October-2019

Kell and Kx blood group systems

The Kell and Kx blood group systems are expressed as covalently linked molecules on red blood cells (RBCs). The Kell blood group system is very polymorphic, with 35 antigens assigned to the system. The expression of Kell glycoprotein on RBCs is not critical to the erythrocyte function. However, the expression of Kx is critical to normal morphology, and null mutations are associated with the McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome. The immunogenicity of the K antigen is second only to the D antigen

Gregory A. Denomme

Immunohematology, Volume 31 , ISSUE 1, 14–19

Article | 28-April-2020

The incidence of red cell alloantibodies underlying panreactive warm autoantibodies

alloantibodies not found within the Rh or Kell blood group systems. Antibodies identified included the following specificities:E (19),D (9),c (7),C (6),S (5),Fya (3),Jka (2),Jkb (2),K (2),Kpa (2),Fyb,Cw,N, and f (ce). This study reinforces the value of adsorption studies, whether using autologous or allogeneic RBCs, when panreactive warm autoantibodies are present. In addition, this study confirms that it is not appropriate in these cases simply to issue blood which is “least incompatible” or Rh

Martin Maley, David G. Bruce, Roderick G. Babb, Angus W. Wells, Mark Williams

Immunohematology, Volume 21 , ISSUE 3, 122–125

Article | 17-February-2021

A prospective, observational study for optimization of antibody screening in pretransfusion compatibility testing

age in male patients (Table 1). Among the 22,888 samples on which TS were performed, 53 samples showed panreactivity with reagent screening RBCs. These patients, on further serologic and clinical evaluation, were diagnosed with AIHA, most of which were determined to be warm AIHA (31 of 53, 58.5%). One-fifth of these AIHA (19%) patients had underlying single or multiple alloantibodies as well, most of which were directed against Rh and Kell blood group antigens (Table 2). Advantages of Antibody

P. Pandey, D. Setya, R. Srivastava, M.K. Singh

Immunohematology, Volume 36 , ISSUE 1, 19–28

Report | 09-October-2019

Distribution of blood groups in the Iranian general population

%), C (2677; 77.04%), c (2557; 73.58%), and E (1059; 30.47%). In the Kell blood group system, 3293 (94.76%) samples were typed as K–k+. For the Kidd and Duffy blood group systems, the following were the most common phenotypes: Jk(a+b+) (1703; 49%), Jk(a+b–) (1006; 28.95%), Fy(a+b+) (1495; 43.02%), and Fy(a+b–) (1005; 28.92%). In the MNS blood group system, the following were the most common phenotypes: M+N+ (1668; 48%), M+N– (1310; 37.70%), S+s+ (1564; 45%), and S–s

Ehsan Shahverdi, Mostafa Moghaddam, Ali Talebian, Hassan Abolghasemi

Immunohematology, Volume 32 , ISSUE 4, 135–139

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