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  • Journal Of Nematology

 

research-article | 30-November-2020

Reproduction of Meloidogyne arenaria race 2 on Flue-cured tobacco possessing resistance genes Rk1 and/or Rk2

surveyed flue-cured tobacco fields, with M. arenaria infesting 56.7% of the fields surveyed, while M. hapla, M. incognita, and M. javanica infested 25.0, 16.7, and 11.7% of surveyed fields, respectively (Eisenback, 2012). As of 2010, the proportion of infested fields had not changed meaningfully (44.9%), with similar trends in species distribution observed in 276 surveyed Virginia tobacco fields. Meloidogyne arenaria continued to predominate, infesting 58.8% of surveyed fields, while M. incognita was

Noah Adamo, Charles S. Johnson, T. David Reed, Jonathan D. Eisenback

Journal of Nematology, Volume 53 , 1–13

Research Article | 31-May-2018

Influence of Temperature on Susceptibility of CVS. Tifguard and Georgia-06G Peanut to Meloidogyne arenaria

Tifguard was released in 2008 as a peanut cultivar with a high level of resistance to Meloidogyne arenaria. Our objective was to determine the role of temperature on infection and development of M. arenaria in Tifguard compared to that in the nematode susceptible cultivar, Georgia-06G. Temperature affected the rate of nematode infection and development in both Tifguard and Georgia-06G (P ≤ 0.05). In Georgia-06G, egg-laying females were observed 25, 20 or 25 days after inoculation at 28°C, 31°C

Weimin Yuan, C. C. Holbrook, Y. Chu, P. Ozias-Akins, D. W. Dickson

Journal of Nematology, Volume 50 , ISSUE 1, 33–40

Article | 05-December-2017

Influence of Root Exudates and Soil on Attachment of Pasteuria penetrans to Meloidogyne arenaria

Abstract: The bacterium Pasteuria penetrans is a parasite of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Endospores of P. penetrans attach to the cuticle of second-stage juveniles (J2) and subsequently sterilize infected females. When encumbered by large numbers of spores, juveniles are less mobile and their ability to infect roots is reduced. This study looked at different factors that influence spore attachment of P. penetrans to the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne arenaria. Pretreatment of J2

CHANG LIU, PATRICIA TIMPER, PINGSHENG JI, TESFAMARIAM MEKETE, SOUMI JOSEPH

Journal of Nematology, Volume 49 , ISSUE 3, 304–310

research-article | 16-April-2020

Nematicide efficacy at managing Meloidogyne arenaria and non-target effects on free-living nematodes in peanut production

Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an important crop in the United States with 757,000 ha planted in 2018, worth $1.15 billion (NASS-USDA, 2019a, b). Much of the production is concentrated in the Southeast where Meloidogyne arenaria (peanut root-knot nematode (PRKN)) can significantly reduce yields with suppression approaching 50% observed in field research (Rodriguez-Kabana and Robertson, 1987; Rodriguez-Kabana et al., 1994a, 1994b). Damage thresholds for this nematode are 1 egg/100 cm3, so any

Zane J. Grabau, Mark D. Mauldin, Alemayehu Habteweld, Ethan T. Carter

Journal of Nematology, Volume 52 , 1–10

Article | 21-July-2017

Evaluation of Steam and Soil Solarization for Meloidogyne arenaria Control in Florida Floriculture Crops

Steam and soil solarization were investigated for control of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne arenaria in 2 yr of field trials on a commercial flower farm in Florida. The objective was to determine if preplant steam treatments in combination with solarization, or solarization alone effectively controlled nematodes compared to methyl bromide (MeBr). Trials were conducted in a field with naturally occurring populations of M. arenaria. Treatments were solarization alone, steam treatment after

NANCY KOKALIS-BURELLE, ERIN N. ROSSKOPF, DAVID M. BUTLER, STEVEN A. FENNIMORE, JOHN HOLZINGER

Journal of Nematology, Volume 48 , ISSUE 3, 183–192

research-article | 30-November-2019

First report of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne species) infecting Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia) in Florida, USA

M. R. Moore, J. A. Brito, S. Qiu, C. G. Roberts, L. A. Combee

Journal of Nematology, Volume 52 , 1–4

research-article | 30-November-2018

Maternal Stress Reduces the Susceptibility of Root-Knot Nematodes to Pasteuria Penetrans

. Following successful penetration, P. penetrans forms either microcolonies or filamentous structures (rhizoids) that extend into the nematode pseudocoelom (Davies et al., 2011). During these early stages of infection, the nematode may produce antimicrobial peptides to prevent proliferation (Pillai et al., 2003). In the later stages of infection, sporogenesis occurs and mature endospores are formed within the body of the female nematode. In a recent study, prior exposure of Meloidogyne arenaria J2 to root

Chang Liu, Pingsheng Ji, Patricia Timper

Journal of Nematology, Volume 51 , 1–8

research-article | 30-November-2018

Screening of Cucurbita maxima and Cucurbita moschata Genotypes for Resistance Against Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, M. javanica, and M. luci

symptoms such as stunting, yellowing, wilting, and yield losses (Caillaud et al., 2008; Moens et al., 2009). Additionally, RKN can increase the severity of plant damage when soilborne fungi such as Fusarium are present (Wang and Roberts, 2006). Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica have commonly been referred to as ‘major’ RKN species because they are globally distributed and are the most destructive nematode species infecting vegetable crops, particularly cucurbitaceous and solanaceous

Gökhan Aydınlı, Ertan Sait Kurtar, Sevilhan Mennan

journal of nematology, Volume 51 , 1–10

research-article | 30-November-2019

Yellow and purple nutsedge and coffee senna as hosts of common plant nematodes in Florida

agriculture and turfgrass production systems. To meet this objective, three experiments were conducted under greenhouse conditions and each was repeated. Material and methods Host status of common weeds to Meloidogyne spp. We evaluated the host status of yellow and purple nutsedge and coffee senna to Meloidogyne arenaria, M. enterolobii, M. floridensis, M. hapla, M. incognita, and M. javanica. ‘AgriSet 334’ tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) was included as a susceptible control. This experiment was

Maria de Lourdes Mendes, Donald W. Dickson, William T. Crow

Journal of Nematology, Volume 52 , 1–9

research-article | 17-March-2020

First report of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne arenaria, on lavender in Turkey

Meloidogyne arenaria (Neal, 1892; Chitwood, 1949) on lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.). PCR was performed in a total volume of 25 μL containing the following: 2.5 μL 10X PCR buffer, 2 mM MgCl2, 200 μM dNTPs, 0.4 μM of each primer, 1 U Taq DNA Polymerase (ABM), 20 ng of DNA and molecular grade water. PCR was performed in a SimpliAmp™ Thermal Cycler (Applied Biosystems, CA, USA) using reaction conditions detailed in cited publications. PCR products were electrophoresed on a 1.5% agarose gel in 1X

Tevfik Özalp, Gonca Könül, Önder Ayyıldız, Adnan Tülek, Zübeyir Devran

Journal of Nematology, Volume 52 , 1–3

Research Article | 17-October-2018

Discovery and Identification of Meloidogyne Species Using COI DNA Barcoding

DNA barcoding with a new cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 primer set generated a 721 to 724 bp fragment used for the identification of 322 Meloidogyne specimens, including 205 new sequences combined with 117 from GenBank. A maximum likelihood analysis grouped the specimens into 19 well-supported clades and four single-specimen lineages. The “major” tropical apomictic species (Meloidogyne arenaria, Meloidogyne incognita, Meloidogyne javanica) were not discriminated by this barcode although some

Thomas Powers, Timothy Harris, Rebecca Higgins, Peter Mullin, Kirsten Powers

Journal of Nematology, Volume 50 , ISSUE 3, 399–412

Article | 21-July-2017

Reproduction of Meloidogyne incognita Race 3 on Flue-cured Tobacco Homozygous for Rk1 and/or Rk2 Resistance Genes

Most commercial tobacco cultivars possess the Rk1 resistance gene to races 1 and 3 of Meloidogyne incognita and race 1 of Meloidogyne arenaria, which has caused a shift in population prevalence in Virginia tobacco fields toward other species and races. A number of cultivars now also possess the Rk2 gene for root-knot resistance. Experiments were conducted in 2013 to 2014 to examine whether possessing both Rk1 and Rk2 increases resistance to a variant of M. incognita race 3 compared to

JILL R. POLLOK, CHARLES S. JOHNSON, J. D. EISENBACK, T. DAVID REED

Journal of Nematology, Volume 48 , ISSUE 2, 79–86

research-article | 30-November-2018

Temporal expression patterns of Pasteuria spp. sporulation genes

host and germinated after sterilization and placed on moist paper until radical emergence. Seedlings were then transplanted into CYG Germination Pouches (Mega International, Newport, MN) for nematode inoculation. All plants were grown in individual pouches. Pouches were watered every 24 hr throughout the 30-d experiment with sterilized deionized water. Freshly hatched Meloidogyne arenaria second-stage juveniles (J2) were exposed to P. penetrans at a rate of 1 J2: 200 endospores. The concentration

Ruhiyyih Dyrdahl-Young, Weiming Hu, Peter DiGennaro

Journal of Nematology, Volume 51 , 1–8

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