Search

  • Select Article Type
  • Abstract Supplements
  • Blood Group Review
  • Call to Arms
  • Hypothesis
  • In Memoriam
  • Interview
  • Introduction
  • Letter to the Editor
  • Short Report
  • abstract
  • Abstracts
  • Article
  • book-review
  • case-report
  • case-study
  • Clinical Practice
  • Commentary
  • Conference Presentation
  • conference-report
  • congress-report
  • Correction
  • critical-appraisal
  • Editorial
  • Editorial Comment
  • Erratum
  • Events
  • Letter
  • Letter to Editor
  • mini-review
  • minireview
  • News
  • non-scientific
  • Obituary
  • original-paper
  • original-report
  • Original Research
  • Pictorial Review
  • Position Paper
  • Practice Report
  • Preface
  • Preliminary report
  • Product Review
  • rapid-communication
  • Report
  • research-article
  • Research Communicate
  • research-paper
  • Research Report
  • Review
  • review -article
  • review-article
  • review-paper
  • Review Paper
  • Sampling Methods
  • Scientific Commentary
  • short-communication
  • short-report
  • Student Essay
  • Varia
  • Welome
  • Select Journal
  • Polish Journal Of Microbiology
  • Journal Of Nematology

 

research-article | 30-November-2020

Enhanced biological control of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, by combined inoculation of cotton or soybean seeds with a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium and pectin-rich orange peel

PGPR strains are able to utilize pectin as a sole carbon and energy source (Hossain et al., 2015); interestingly, citrus peels which are pectin-rich and an abundant and inexpensive agricultural waste product (Rafiq et al., 2018) have been previously demonstrated to increase the efficacy of soybean growth promotion mediated by B. velezensis PGPR strains when co-inoculated with orange peel powder as a seed treatment (Hassan et al., 2019). In the presence of different carbohydrates (pectin, sucrose

Mohammad K. Hassan, Kathy S. Lawrence, Edward J. Sikora, Mark R. Liles, Joseph W. Kloepper

Journal of Nematology, Volume 53 , 1–17

original-paper | 28-January-2020

Banana Peels: A Promising Substrate for the Coproduction of Pectinase and Xylanase from Aspergillus fumigatus MS16

. Consequently, thousands of tons of BP are accumulated as the domestic and food industry’s waste, which is not effectively utilized. With considerable quantities of lignin (6–12%), pectin (10–21%), cellulose (7–10%), and hemicelluloses (6–9.4%) (Emaga et al. 2008), BP has been reported as an effective fermentation substrate (Kiranmayi et al. 2011; Rehman et al. 2014). Various studies have been conducted to produce industrially important enzymes using BP including alpha-amylase by Bacillus subtilis and

MAHWISH ZEHRA, MUHAMMAD NOMAN SYED, MUHAMMAD SOHAIL

Polish Journal of Microbiology, Volume 69 , ISSUE 1, 19–26

No Record Found..
Page Actions