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Review | 14-March-2020

Laboratory methods for Rh immunoprophylaxis: a review

The recommended dose of Rh immune globulin for postpartum Rh immunoprophylaxis is based on an estimation of the volume of the fetomaternal hemorrhage, if any, measured as the percent of fetal RBCs in a sample of the D– mother’s blood. Laboratory methods for distinguishing fetal from maternal RBCs have been based on their different blood types (D+ versus D–) or predominant hemoglobin content (hemoglobin F versus hemoglobin A). We conducted a review of the medical literature

S. Gerald Sandler, Srividya Sathiyamoorthy

Immunohematology, Volume 26 , ISSUE 3, 92–103

Article | 14-October-2020

Serologic aspects of treating immune thrombocytopenic purpura using intravenous Rh immune globulin

infusions of IV RhIG in D+ ITP patients, the direct and indirect antiglobulin tests become transiently positive, reflecting passively transferred anti-D and other alloantibodies that were present in the infused IV RhIG. These consistent and predictable serologic findings contrast with the inconsistent and weak anti-D reactivity observed when D– women are treated with relatively small doses of intramuscular RhIG for Rh immunoprophylaxis. The pathophysiology of ITP and the effect of infusing IV RhIG

Can M. Savasman, S. Gerald Sandler

Immunohematology, Volume 17 , ISSUE 4, 106–110

Article | 03-November-2020

Immunoprophylaxis using intravenous Rh immune globulin should be standard practice when selected D-negative patients are transfused with D-positive random donor platelets

alloimmunization in D– patients requiring red cell transfusions or D– females during pregnancy or after delivery of D+ newborns. The absence of a comparable practice standard for platelet transfusions is based, in part, on concern that intramuscular injections of conventional RhIG may cause local hemorrhage in thrombocytopenic persons. The recent availability of a Food and Drug Administration-approved preparation of intravenous RhIG makes Rh immunoprophylaxis in thrombocytopenic patients safe and

Clinton A. Ewing, Dawn H. Rumsey, Albert F. Langeberg, S. Gerald Sandler

Immunohematology, Volume 14 , ISSUE 4, 133–137

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