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  • Immunohematology

 

Article | 09-November-2020

Anti-Jk3 with no clinical evidence of HDN

A sample was submitted to a reference lab from a 27-year-old Asian female, gravida 4 para 1, for antibody identification. Anti-Jk3 with an IgM component was identified. Subsequently, the antibody was eluted from the infant’s cord and venous red blood cells. Normal bilirubin and hematocrit levels ruled out hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Anti-Jk3 has been implicated in two cases of mild HDN. In this case, this noncomplement-binding antibody caused a positive direct Coombs test

Celeste J. Hunter, Michael D. Ziebol

Immunohematology, Volume 13 , ISSUE 4, 136–137

Case report | 14-October-2020

Moderate hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) due to anti-Rh17 produced by a black female with an e variant phenotype

Marla C. Brumit, Gary E. Carnahan, James R. Stubbs, Jill R. Storry, Marion E. Reid

Immunohematology, Volume 18 , ISSUE 2, 40–42

Article | 14-October-2020

Anti-Mta associated with three cases of hemolytic disease of the newborn

The Mta antigen is a low-frequency red blood cell (RBC) surface antigen and is an established antigen of the MNSs blood group system. There has been one report of anti-Mta –induced hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) in the literature to date. We describe a family in which three children were affected by neonatal anemia. The clinical and hematologic findings were consistent with HDN, despite repeatedly negative direct antiglobulin tests (DAT) on cord RBCs. Serologic investigations

Carol C. Cheung, Daniel Challis, George Fisher, Susan J. Russell, Andrew Davis, Hayley Bruce, Julie Watt, Beng H. Chong

Immunohematology, Volume 18 , ISSUE 2, 37–39

Article | 14-December-2020

Determining the significance of anti-K1 in hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN)

Anti-K1 is capable of causing severe hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), but few cases are seen due to the low frequency of the antigen. A total of 1,215 pregnancies from 1962 to 1989 were reviewed. There were 404 non-anti-D clinically significant antibodies, of which 103 (25%) were anti-K1. Anti-K1 was detected in nine of the women at delivery, of whom two had antigen-positive infants who were clinically unaffected. Antigen typing was done on 64 of the 85 fathers. Forty-seven were K: - 1

Patricia L. Strohm, Janice F. Blazina, Richard W. O'Shaughnessy, Melanie S. Kennedy, Jane M. Moore

Immunohematology, Volume 7 , ISSUE 2, 40–42

Article | 18-October-2020

Moderate hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-Hr0 in a mother with the D––/D–– phenotype

Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) due to anti-Hr0 antibody is typically severe and often fatal. We report a case of moderate HDN due to anti-Hr0 in a woman with the D––/D–– phenotype. A 33-yearold woman delivered her second child who was mildly jaundiced. The highest level of bilirubin was 26.1 mg/dL on the third day postpartum and the hemoglobin concentration was 14.0 g/dL. The newborn recovered after phototherapy and no mental retardation was noticed after 1 year

Barbara Żupańska, B. Lenkiewicz

Immunohematology, Volume 16 , ISSUE 3, 109–111

Case report | 09-November-2020

A case of hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-Kpa

A patient with hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) due to maternal anti-Kpa alloimmunization is described. Although there are few reports in the literature, it appears that HDN due to anti-Kpa is often mild and transfusion therapy is rarely required. However, in this case, the baby’s hemoglobin progressively decreased and on day 18 a blood transfusion was administered, but jaundice was not severe enough for exchange transfusion.

Laura Costamagna, Mario Barbarini, Gianluca Viarengo, Ambrogio Pagani, Paola Isernia, Laura Salvaneschi

Immunohematology, Volume 13 , ISSUE 2, 61–62

Case report | 17-November-2020

Case report: anti-Cra in pregnancy

A 39-year-oId Grenadian multiparous patient presented in the 12th week ofpregnancy. Her red cells were found to have the rare Cr(a-) (ISBT Number 202001) phenotype within the Cromer complex, and her serum contained anti-Cra. To date, anti-Cra has not been implicated in hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), but there are very few published reports on this topic. This case provided an excellent opportunity for study. The patient’s serum showed no detectable functional activity in in vitro

Anne C. Dickson, Claire Guest, Mary Jordon, Jackie Banks, Belinda Kumpel

Immunohematology, Volume 11 , ISSUE 1, 14–17

Article | 18-October-2020

Significant ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn in a group B infant with a group A2 mother

ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) occurs almost exclusively in infants of blood group A or B who are born to group O mothers because IgG anti-A or -B occurs more commonly in group O than in group A or B individuals. We report a case in which clinically significant ABO-HDN occurred in a group B neonate from anti-B of a group A2 mother. The IgG anti-B titer was much higher (256) than that found in a group A1 mother/infant control group (≤ 32). The maternal antibody screen was negative

Hye-Ran Jeon, Beverly E.W. Calhoun, Mohammad Pothiawala, Marguerite Herschel, Beverly W. Baron

Immunohematology, Volume 16 , ISSUE 3, 105–108

Article | 10-November-2020

Anti-Holley detected in a primary immune response

. The antibody was reactive at room temperature, 37°C, and in the antiglobulin phase. IgG and IgM components of anti-Hy were demonstrated in the maternal serum, documenting a primary immune response. This resulted in serologic findings not previously described for anti-Hy. A direct antiglobulin test on the newborn red cells was negative and there was no clinical evidence of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). A monocyte monolayer assay performed with maternal serum yielded negative results

Vicki J. Barrett, M. Margaret O’Brien, John J Moulds, Peggy Spruell, Valerie Jackson, James R. Stubbs

Immunohematology, Volume 12 , ISSUE 2, 62–65

Article | 10-November-2020

Do monocyte ADCC assays accurately predict the severity of hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by antibodies to high-frequency antigens?

Monocyte ADCC assays are helpful indicators of the severity of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) due to anti-D. It would be particularly useful if the assays also accurately predicted the ability of antibodies to high-frequency antigens (HFA) to cause HDN. To investigate this possibility, 14 antenatal sera containing antibodies to HFA were tested and the results correlated with the severity of HDN. Antibody titers were determined using an indirect antiglobulin test (IAT). Eight sera 

Stephen F. Garner, Alan Devenish

Immunohematology, Volume 12 , ISSUE 1, 20–26

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