IMPROVING TRANSPORTATION SAFETY OF INJURED PERSONS BY TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE BIOMECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE HUMAN BODY

Publications

Share / Export Citation / Email / Print / Text size:

Transport Problems

Silesian University of Technology

Subject: Economics, Transportation, Transportation Science & Technology

GET ALERTS

eISSN: 2300-861X

DESCRIPTION

14
Reader(s)
15
Visit(s)
0
Comment(s)
0
Share(s)

VOLUME 16 , ISSUE 4 (December 2021) > List of articles

IMPROVING TRANSPORTATION SAFETY OF INJURED PERSONS BY TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE BIOMECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE HUMAN BODY

Phridon GOGIASHVILI * / Revaz LEKVEISHVILI / Gocha LEKVEISHVILI

Keywords : vibrations; vibration suppression; vibration analysis; ambulance environment; tolerance criteria; injured patient; health deterioration level; patient safety; incident monitoring

Citation Information : Transport Problems. Volume 16, Issue 4, Pages 107-119, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/tp-2021-064

License : (CC BY 4.0)

Received Date : 21-May-2020 / Accepted: 10-December-2021 / Published Online: 24-December-2021

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Ambulance vehicles play a vital role in sustaining the life of injured persons and should a provide safe transportation route to the medical institution. Transportation of injured patients in severe/critical conditions should be carried out with high caution, as there is no guarantee that patients’ health will not be harmed. The goal of this study is to minimize exposure to the external factors such as random shocks, sharp jumps, vibrations caused by irregular roads, speed breakers, weather, etc., that could influence the tasking ability of the medical team and further threaten the life of the already injured patient. This topic has not been widely researched and still requires implementation of novel standards that should improve the safety of the patient. This article aims to define the biomechanics of cabin occupant safety, introduce ways of collecting live data and develop new mechanisms that would allow safer transportation of patients without any meaningful health deterioration causing by the above-mentioned external factors. This study will identify safety hazards in the ambulance environment and determine the effectiveness of suggested countermeasures to mitigate any further injury or deterioration of the patient’s health.

Content not available PDF Share

FIGURES & TABLES

REFERENCES

1. Mechanical Vibration – Measurement and Evaluation of Human Exposure to Hand – Transmitted Vibration – Part 1: General Guidelines. ISO 5349-1. International Organization for Standardization. Geneva, 2001.

2. Mechanical Vibration and Shock – Evaluation of Human Exposure to Whole Body Vibration – Part 4: Guidelines for the Evaluation of the Effects of Vibration and Rotational Motion on Passenger and Crew Comfort in Fixed Guideway Transport Systems. ISO 2631-4. International Organization for Standardization. Geneva, 2001.

3. Runciman, W.B. & Merry, A.F. Crises in clinical care: an approach to management. BMJ Qual Saf Health Care. 2005. Vol. 14. No. 3. P. 156-163.

4. Paul, T. & Jaisawal, R.K. & Trikande, M. Physiological Response of Vehicle Driver to Ground Generated Vehicle Vibration. In: Symposium on International Automotive Technology. 1999.

5. Poddan, G.S. & Griffin, M.J. Evaluation of whole-body vibration the vehicle. Journal of Sound and Vibration. 2002. Vol. 253(1). P. 195-213.

6. Rasmunssen, G. Human Body Vibration Exposure and Its Measurement. Bruel & Kjaer brochure. 1996.

7. Schioler, T. & Lipczak, H. & Pedersen, B.L. Incidence of adverse events in hospitals. A retrospective study of medical records. Ugeskr Laeger. 2001.

8. Vincent, C. & Neale, G. & Woloshynowych, M. Adverse events in British hospitals: preliminary retrospective record review. BMJ. 2001. Vol. 322. P. 517-519.

9. Flabouris, A. Patient referral and transportation to a regional tertiary ICU: patient demographics, severity of illness and outcome comparison with non-transported patients. Anaesth Intensive Care. 1999. Vol. 27. No. 4. P. 385-390.

10. Holland, J. & Cooksley, D.G. Safety of aeromedical transport in Australia: a retrospective study. Med Journal Aust. 2005. Vol. 182(1). P.17-19.

11. Fromm, R.E. & Cambell, E. & Schlieter, P. Inadequacy of visual alarms in helicopter air medical transport. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995. Vol. 66(8). P. 784-786.

12. Rivers, E. & Nguyen, B. &, Havstad, S & et al. For the early goal directed therapy collaborative group. Early goal-directed therapy. N Engl Journal Med. 2001. Vol. 345. P. 1368-1377.

13. Cummings, G. & OíKeefe, G. Scene disposition and mode of transport following rural trauma: a prospective cohort study comparing patient costs. Journal Emerg Med. 2000. Vol. 18(3). P. 349-354.

14. Mechanical Vibration and Shock – Range of Idealized Values to Characterize Seated Body Biodynamic Response Under Vertical Vibration. ISO/DIS 5982. International Organization for Standardization. Geneva, 2000.

15. Panaitescu-Liess, R. Biomechanical modeling of the human body under the action of vibration. PhD Thesis. University of Architecture, Faculty de Utilaj Technology. Bucharest, 2013.

EXTRA FILES

COMMENTS